Dr. Elaine Augustine

Title: Instructor II

Area of Interest: Psychology

Phone: 941-359-4246

Curriculum Vitae: CV

Email: eaugustine1@sar.usf.edu

Office: SMC B217

Dr. Elaine Augustine is an Instructor II of Psychology at the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.

She received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Indiana University and her B.S. in psychology from Southern University, Baton Rouge. Dr. Augustine’s research examines object representation and categorization in infancy and early childhood. One motivation behind her research is to address questions about the origins and nature of object similarity as a basis for object recognition, and in particular, the origins and nature of similarity in shape. She has also examined whether very young children are able to judge shape similarity by using the same kinds of shape information that is used by adults to recognize objects. Dr. Augustine has a passion for teaching and has taught courses in introductory psychology, child and adolescent psychology, language development, and research methods.

Research

Augustine, E. (April, 2012) Children’s object recognition: The use of part-shape and part- relation information. To be presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association, Oklahoma City, OK.

Augustine, E., Smith, L.B., & Jones, S.S. (2011). Parts and relations in young children’s shape-based object recognition. Journal of Cognition and Development, 12(4), 556-572.

Augustine, E. (March, 2010). Children’s ability to use part-shapes and part-relations in object categorization. Presented at the International Conference on Infant Studies, Baltimore, MD.

Augustine, E., & Jones, S. (April, 2008). Children attend to part-shapes and part-relations in object categorization. Presented at the International Conference on Infant Studies, Vancouver, Canada.

Augustine, E., & Jones, S. (March, 2007). Early word learning affects later alphabet learning via its effects on shape perception. Presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research on Child Development, Boston, MA.