USF Sarasota-Manatee makes every effort to offer all the degree and certificate programs listed in this catalog. USF Sarasota-Manatee does not commit itself to offer all the courses, programs, and majors listed in this catalog unless there is sufficient demand to justify them. Some courses may be offered only in alternative semesters or years, or even less frequently if there is little demand.

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ACG 2021 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BU ACC Study of basic accounting principles including the recording and reporting of financial activity. The preparation and interpretation of financial statements. None
ACG 2071 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 BU ACC A study of the accountant’s role in assisting management in the planning and controlling of business activities. PR: ACG 2021 with a grade of C- or better
ACG 3074 Managerial Accounting for Non-Business Majors 3 BU ACC The study of the uses of accounting data internally by managers in planning and controlling the affairs of organizations. Does not count towards major or CPA requirements. Not available for credit for Business majors.
ACG 3103 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 BU ACC Theory and methodology underlying financial reporting, including the FASB’s conceptual framework, the accounting process, financial statements, accounting changes, present value applications, and current assets. PR: ACG 2071 with a grade of C or better, not C-; ACG 2021 with a grade of “C” or better.
ACG 3113 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 BU ACC Continuation of ACG 3103. Topics covered include property, plant and equipment, intangibles, current liabilities, long-term debt, leases, tax allocation, statement of cash flows. PR: ACG 3103 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
ACG 3341 Cost Accounting and Control I 3 BU ACC Deals with cost accounting systems for different entities, cost behavior patterns, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant information for decision making, and budgets and standard costs for planning and control. PR: ACG 2021 and ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ACG 3401 Accounting Information Systems 3 BU ACC This course provides students with a basic understanding of well-controlled information systems in a variety of technological environments with added emphasis on the collection, processing, and reporting of accounting information. PR: ACG 3103 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
ACG 4123 Intermediate Financial Accounting III 3 BU ACC Theory and practice underlying stockholders’ equity, dilutive securities and EPS, derivatives, revenue recognition, post-retirement benefits, error analysis, full disclosure, and other current accounting topics. PR:ACG 3113 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
ACG 4351 Cost Accounting And Control II 3 BU ACC Application of the material covered in ACG 3341 with specific emphasis on cost allocations, performance measurements, analysis of current cost accounting systems and accounting in today’s environment (giving consideration to the influences of the international environment). PR: ACG 3103 and ACG 3341 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ACG 4501 Governmental/Not-For-Profit Accounting 3 BM ACC Application of financial and managerial accounting, and auditing, principles and theory to both governmental and not-for-profit entities. PR: ACG 3113 (C or better)
ACG 4632 Auditing I 3 BU ACC This course provides a sound conceptual foundation of basic auditing process from the perspective of the public accounting profession. Professional standards, ethics, legal responsibilities, and the utilization of technology are addressed. PR: ACG 3113 and ACG 3401.
ACG 4642 Auditing II 3 BU ACC Further development of material covered in ACG 4632, with special emphasis on additional reporting topics and audit techniques not previously addressed. PR: ACG 4632 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
ACG 4931 Selected Topics In Accounting 1-3 BU ACC The course content will depend on student demand and instructor’s interest.  None
ACG 5205 Advanced Finanacial Accounting 3 BU ACC Accounting for business combinations, preparation of consolidated financial statements, home office/branch relationships, foreign operations and transactions, partnerships. PR: ACG 3113 with a grade of C or better, not C-
ACG 5505 Governmental/Not-For-Profit Accounting 3 BU ACC Application of financial and managerial accounting, and auditing, principles and theory to both governmental and not-for-profit entities. PR: ACG 3113. CR: ACG 4632.
ACG 5675 Internal and Operational Auditing 3 BU ACC The objective of Internal and Operational Auditing is to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the theory and practice of internal and operational auditing and to apply relevant audit principles and techniques to selected audit problems. PR: ACG 3113 and ACG 3401. CR: ACG 4632.
AFA 4931 Selected Topics in Africana Studies 1-3 AS AFA Topics offered are selected to reflect student needs and faculty interests. In depth study in such areas as the Black Student and the American Educational Process; the Black Experience in the Americas; European Expansion in Africa to 19th century; Contemporary Economic Problems in Africa. None
AMH 2010 American History I 3 AS HTY This class is an introductory survey of American history from Columbus and “First Contact” to Reconstruction. None HP, SMSS
AMH 2020 American History II 3 AS HTY A history of the United States with attention given to relevant developments in the Western Hemisphere from 1877 to the present. None SMSS, HP
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary Era 3 AS HTY Emphasis on the causes of the American revolution, the nature of Constitution-making, and the establishment of the federal system. Also examines the significance of loyalism, violence, and slavery in American society from 1750-1789. None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 AS HTY A comprehensive study of American society and political culture from 1789-1828. Focuses on demographic trends, party systems, expansionism, Indian policy, labor, and ethno-cultural conflicts. None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 AS HTY A study of America from the end of Reconstruction to World War I. Ranging over political, social, and international developments, the course covers industrialization, immigration, unions, reform, feminism, race relations and imperialism. None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 AS HTY The United States from World War I to the end of World War II. Covering political, social and international developments, the course examines the lives of Americans, including minorities and women, during war, prosperity, and the Great Depression. None
AMH 3421 Early Florida 3 AS HTY A history of colonial Florida under the Spanish and English. Florida as an area of discovery, colonization, and imperial conflict; the emergence of Florida within the regional setting. None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 AS HTY An historical survey of Florida from the territorial period to the modern era. An examination of the social, political, and economic changes occurring in Florida between 1821 and the 1980s. None
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 AS HTY A study of women in the evolution of American society from 1877 to the present. Women’s roles in the family, economy, politics, immigration, wars, religion and reform movements will be examined. None
AMH 3571 African American History to 1865 3 AS AFA This course surveys the history of people of African-descent in the U.S. from the beginning of the Atlantic Slave Trade to 1865. Major topics include the rise & fall of slavery, ethnic & racial identities, resistance, gender, culture, and community. None HP
AMH 3572 African American History since 1865 3 AS AFA This course explores the history of African Americans since 1865. Major topics include the struggle for equality, class and gender dimensions of the Black freedom struggle, and the varied approaches in the fight against oppression and inequality. None HP
AML 3031 American Literature From the Beginnings to 1860 3 AS ENG A study of representative works from the period of early settlement through American Romanticism, with emphasis on such writers as Cooper, Irving, Bryant, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Thoreau, and Poe, among others. None
AML 3032 American Literature From 1860 to 1912 3 AS ENG A study of representative works of selected American Realists and early Naturalists, among them Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, Robinson, Dunbar, and Johnson. None
AML 3051 American Literature From 1912-1945 3 AS ENG A study of poetry, drama, and fiction by such writers as Pound, Stein, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Porter, Toomer, Cummings, Williams, Anderson, Steinbeck, Wright, West, Stevens, Henry Miller, and others. None
AML 3604 African American Literature 3 AS ENG A study of black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W.E.B. Dubois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni. None 6AC
AML 3630 U.S. Latino/Latina Literature in English 3 AS ENG This 3000-level literature course surveys American English literature by Latino/Latina writers (with Spanish American ancestry). Authors may include Piri Thomas, Sandra Cisneros, Esmeralda Santiago, Luis Valdéz, Tomás Rivera, Oscar Hijuelos, etc. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.
AML 4111 Nineteenth-Century American Novel 3 AS ENG A study of the American novel from its beginnings through 1900, including such novelists as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, James, Twain, Crane, and Dreiser, among others. None
AML 4121 Twentieth-Century American Novel 3 AS ENG A study of major trends and influences in American prose fiction from 1900 to the present, including works by such writers as Hemingway, London, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Mailer, Bellow, Ellison, Donleavy, Updike, Vonnegut, and others. None
AML 4261 Literature of the South 3 AS ENG A study of the major writers of the Southern Renaissance, including writers such as Faulkner, Wolfe, Caldwell, Hellman, McCullers, O’Connor, Warren, Styron, Tate, Davidson, and Dickey. None
AML 4300 Selected American Authors 3 AS ENG The study of two or three related major authors in American literature. The course may include such writers as Melville and Hawthorne, Hemingway and Faulkner, James and Twain, Pound and Eliot, Stevens and Lowell, etc. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. None
AML 5305 Studies in Individual American Authors 3 AM ENG This course provides advanced study of two or three selected authors who are considered to have made major contributions to the development of American literature. None
ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3 AS ANT The cross-cultural study of the human species in biological and social perspective. Surveys the four major branches of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and cultural anthropology. None SMSS, SS, ALAMEA
ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology 3 AS ANT Students are exposed to methods and concepts for cross cultural study of the world’s peoples. Case studies demonstrate variations in human adaptation and encourage an understanding of and appreciation for diverse cultures and their values. None SMSS, SS
ANT 2511 Biological Anthropology 3 AS ANT This is an overview of biological anthropology. It covers areas such as evolutionary theory and genetics (critical thinking and scientific process), human variation (diversity), and epidemiology (environment). It also has a historical component. PR: ANT 2511L NS
ANT 2511L Biological Anthropology Laboratory 1 AS ANT This is a lab companion to an overview of biological anthropology. The students will be doing laboratories which are relevant to the class topics covered in the lecture hall in ANT 2511. PR: ANT 2511
ANT 3005 The Anthropological Perspective 3 AS ANT Presents the basic concepts of anthropology as they are relevant to contemporary life. Aims at enabling the student to understand the anthropologist’s cross-cultural view of the human species as adapting through biosocial means to life on this planet. For non-anthropology majors only. May not be counted for credit toward an anthropology major. AF, ALAMEA
ANT 3101 Archaeology 3 AS ANT Focuses on critical thinking about the past, archaeological research. Methods, theory, web resources, and scientific analysis in the study of world prehistory, from human origins to modern times. PR:None; ANT 2000 recommended prior to enrolling for Anthropology Majors/Minors SS
ANT 3610 Anthropological Linguistics 3 AS ANT The comparative study of language in its cultural context, especially emphasizing the role of language in the cultural interpretation of physical and social reality. None SS
ANT 4241 Anthropology of Religion 3 AS ANT The cross-cultural study of the social and cultural aspects of religion will be explored. Religious activities in traditional and modern societies will be discussed. Ritual behavior, religious practitioners, and symbols of belief will be considered. PR: ANT 2000, ANT 2410. 6A
ANT 4302 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 3 AS ANT Examines roles of women, men, other genders and social, economic, and political aspects of sex and gender, from a biocultural, 4-field anthropological perspective, emphasizing non-Western societies and cross-cultural comparison in past and present. an anthropology or a women’s studies class. MW
ANT 4316 Ethnic Diversity in the United States 3 AS ANT Special concerns include ethnic diversity in American society, historical and contemporary diversity in values, experiences, and lifestyles, and an examination of policies and problems affecting ethnic groups in the United States. PR: ANT 2410 or DPR. MW
ANT 4401 Exploring Cross-Cultural Diversity 3 AS ANT This course will address a variety of challenging issues related to the general topic of cross-cultural diversity in contemporary American life. None MW
ANT 4432 The Individual and Culture 3 AS ANT The relationship between the individual and society is studied cross-culturally. Main themes include child-rearing practices, psychosomatic illness and curing. Discussion of theories and models of personality development with special reference to their applicability to the emerging field of cross-cultural mental health planning. PR: ANT 2410 or DPR. 6AC, MW
ANT 4462 Health, Illness, and Culture 3 AS ANT The study of health and human behavior in cross-cultural perspective. Main themes include: the impact of disease on the development of human culture; comparative studies of curing practices; medical systems in their relationship to ideology. Emphasis on understanding the role of medicine, and the behavior of both practitioners and patients in modern societies. PR: ANT 2410 or DPR.
ANT 4586 Prehistoric Human Evolution 3 AS ANT A survey of the fossil record from the early primates through the ascent of Homo sapiens sapiens, focusing on the human lineage. Biosocial patterns and cultures of the past are also covered. PR: ANT 2511 or DPR.
ANT 4905 Individual Research 2-4 AS ANT Individual guidance in a selected research project. Contract required prior to registration. DPR. S/U only.
ANT 4930 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-3 AS ANT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. Variable depending on topic or DPR.
ARH 2xxx Art and Culture 3 ART This course offers students an enhanced appreciation and understanding of art.  Student will critically evaluate a broad range of imagery, media, artists, movements and historical periods in the visual arts. None 6AC, SMHU
ARH 2050 History of Visual Arts I 3 TA ART Survey of World Art to AD 1300. Introduction to problems of analyzing and interpreting the art of various cultures without making the Western perspective a privileged one. None HP, FA
ARH 2051 History of Visual Arts II 3 TA ART Survey of World Art since 1300. Introduction to problems of analyzing and interpreting the art of various cultures without making the Western perspective a privileged one. None HP, FA
ARH 4930 Art History: Selected Topics 1-3 TA ART Lecture/discussion course designed to offer areas of expertise of visiting scholars or specific interests of resident faculty. None
ASL 2140C Basic American Sign Language 4 BC CSD Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) as used in the deaf community. General discussion of ASL structure and introduction to various manual communication systems and philosophies. Emphasis on building a basic vocabulary. One hour of laboratory course work is included. Open to all majors. DPR
ASL 2150C Intermediate American Sign Language 4 BC CSD A continuation of the basic course which expands the student’s signing skills and introduces American Sign Language (ASL) idioms. Provides a greater opportunity for skill development in ASL structure and idiomatic usage. One hour of laboratory course work is included. PR: ASL 2140C, DPR
AST 3033 Contemporary Thinking in Astronomy 3 AS AST Seminar designed to assist the layman, with no scientific background, in comprehending contemporary developments in Astronomy. Necessary background material is provided by the instructor and a text. Topics covered in recent years include the space program, pulsars, x-ray astronomy, black holes, extra-terrestrial life, interacting galaxies, cosmology. Junior or Senior Standing or CI NS
BCH  3053 Introductory Biochemistry 3 AS CHM This course is a one-semester, introductory course in Biochemistry. This course is open to all majors and strongly recommended for Biomedical Science majors. This course is not repeatable for credit. PR: CHM 2210 and BSC 2010
BOT 3152C Field Botany 3 AS BIN  A field course emphasizing Identification and classification of native and naturalized flowering plants of Florida including historical, climatic, and floristic aspects of plant communities. Fieldwork required. Lecture and Laboratory. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046 and (MAC 1105 or higher level MAC course or STA 2023); CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
BOT 3850 Medical Botany 3 AS BIO Study of agents that are produced by plants and that are toxic or psychoactive in human beings or are useful as remedies. Lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2210, and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023); CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
BSC 1005 Biological Principles for Non Majors 3 AS BCM A comprehensive introduction to living systems, including the scientific basis
of biology, cell structure and function, genetic mechanisms, human anatomy and
physiology, and ecological and evolutionary processes
None SMNS
BSC 2010 Cellular Processes 3 AS BCM This course deals with biological systems at the cellular and subcellular levels. Topics include an introduction to biochemistry, cell structure and function, enzymes, respiration, mitosis and meiosis, genetics and gene expression. CP: BSC 2010L SMNS, NS
BSC 2010L Cellular Processes Laboratory 1 AS BCM Laboratory portion of Biology I Cellular Processes relating to cellular and
subcellular structure and function. Mitosis, meiosis, and Mendelian genetics
will be stressed
CR: BSC 2010.
BSC 2011 Biodiversity 3 AS BCM Biodiversity is an analysis of biological systems at the organismal level:
evolution, speciation, history of life, and ecology
PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, CHM 2045. CR: BSC 2011L  SMNS
BSC 2011L Biodiversity Laboratory 1 AS BIN Laboratory portion of Biology II Diversity relating to organismal structure and function. Microscopy, as well as, plant and animal development will be stressed. CR: BSC 2011
BSC 2093C Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 AS BIN Basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, tissues, anatomical terminology, anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture and Laboratory. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, and CHM 2045
BSC 2094C Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 AS BIN Anatomy and physiology of the autonomic nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Lecture and Laboratory. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, BSC 2093C, and CHM 2045
BSC 3312 Marine Biology 3 AS BIN A survey of the marine environment, the types of organisms found inhabiting a variety of marine habitats, and the adaptations of the organisms to those habitats. Emphasis is placed on shallow water Florida environments. Lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course, or STA 2023); CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
BSC 3453 Research Methods in Biology 3 AM BIO This course utilizes a hands-on, application-oriented approach to enhance student understanding of: framing scientific questions based on scientific literature; experimental design; data analysis; writing technical reports; and presenting seminars. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, STA 2023
BSC 4052 Conservation Biology 3 AM BIN This course provides an extensive introduction to current models and empirical study in conservation biology, including substantial hands-on experience with programming methods for study of data and models. PR: PCB 3043, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046 and Calculus (MAC 2241/2281/2311).
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 AS BIO Study of biological, economic, ethical, legal, political, and social issues relating to current environmental problems. None SMCD
BSC  4905 Independent Study 1-3 AS BIO Specialized independent study determined by the student’s needs and interests. The written contract required by the Department of Biology specifies the regulations governing independent study. None
BSC 4910 Undergraduate Research 1-4 AS BIO S/U only. Junior standing and 3.0 GPA required. Individual investigation with faculty supervision. Written contract by Department is necessary prior to registration. PR: CHM 2210 and (MAC 1105 or higher MAC course or STA 2023)
BSC 4933 Selected Topics in Biology 1-4 AS BIO The course content will depend on student demand and instructor’s interest. None
BSC 4937 Seminar in Marine Biology 2 AS BIN Course focuses on developing the student’s understanding of contemporary research in the field of Marine. Background information presented and assigned reading will vary according to instructor. PR: BSC 3312C, CHM 2210 and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023); CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712 and CHM 2211
BUL 3320 Law And Business I 3 BU GBA This course covers the nature of legal and societal institutions and environments, and major aspects of public, private, UCC and related business law. None
BUL 5332 Law and the Accountant 3 BU GBA A comprehensive study of commercial law as it affects the practice of accounting. PR: BUL 3320 or CI.
CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System 3 BC CJP An introduction to the structure and operation of law enforcement, prosecution, the courts, and corrections. Also includes brief coverage of major reported crimes. None SS
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 BC CJP Provides a basic understanding of the complex factors related to crime, with concentration on principal theoretical approaches to the explanation of crime. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CI
CCJ 3621 Patterns of Criminal Behavior 3 BC CJP Reviews the nature and extent of the crime problem. The course will concentrate on major patterns of offender behavior including crimes against the person, property crimes, violent crimes, economic/white collar offense, syndicated (organized) crimes, consensual crimes, female crime, political crime, and will examine criminal career data. Junior standing
CCJ 3701 Research Methods in Criminal Justice I 3 BC CJP Introduces the student to some of the fundamentals of knowledge-generating processes in criminal justice. Junior standing; PR: a grade of C or better (a grade of C- is not acceptable) in CCJ 3117
CCJ 4450 Criminal Justice Administration 3 BC CJP This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of both the practical and theoretical aspects of the administration of criminal justice agencies. The major focus will be on law enforcement and correctional agencies. Junior standing; PR: CJE 4114 or CJT 4100 or CI
CCJ 4604 Abnormal Behavior and Criminality 3 BC CJP A systematic introduction to the relationship between mental illness and criminality, with focus on psychiatric labeling of deviant behavior and its implications for the handling of the criminal offender. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CI
CCJ 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 BC CJP (a) Students wishing to enroll must make arrangements with a faculty member during the semester prior to actually taking the course.(b) A minimum of four 4 CCJ courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment.(c) First consideration will be given to Criminology majors.(d) Individual faculty members may add additional requirements at their discretion. No more than six hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 4910 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours required for the major. This course is specifically designed to enable advanced students the opportunity to do in-depth independent work in the area of criminal justice. Each student will be under the close supervision of a faculty member of the program. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621, CI. S/U only
CCJ 4910 Directed Research 1-3 BC CJP (a) Students wishing to enroll must make arrangements with a faculty member during the semester prior to actually taking the course.(b) A minimum of four 4 CCJ courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment.(c) First consideration will be given to Criminology majors.(d) Individual faculty members may add additional requirements at their discretion. No more than six hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 4910 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours required for the major. This course is designed to provide students with a research experience in which they will work closely with faculty on the development and implementation of research projects in the area of criminal justice. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621, CI. S/U only
CCJ 4930 Critical Issues in Policing 3 BC CJP Focuses on some of the most critical issues in law enforcement today including: understanding and controlling police use of deadly force; police deviance; police prejudice and discrimination; violence-prone police officers; substance abuse by police officers; and administrative review of alleged police brutality. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CJE 4114 or CI
CCJ 4933 Selected Topics in Criminology 3 BC CJP Lecture course. Topic varies and is designed to address a wide variety of issues in criminology and criminal justice. Open to non-majors with CI. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3621, CCJ 3117 or CI
CCJ 4934 Seminar in Criminology 3 BC CJP These variable topic seminars are used for the in-depth study and discussion of the relationships among culture, gender, ethics, age, society, and criminal behavior. Such examinations may include the options the criminal justice does (or does not) have to deal with these interactions, and the ethics and efficacy of the system’s response. Open to non-majors with CI. Senior standing; PR: a grade of C or better (a grade of C- is not acceptable) in CCJ 3701 SMCC, 6AC, MW
CCJ 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 AM CJP This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the American criminal justice system and crime theories, and show competency in research methods, critical thinking, and scholarly writing. PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3701
CCJ 4940 Internship For Criminal Justice Majors 3 BC CJP The internship will consist of placement with one or more of the agencies comprising the criminal justice system. This course will enable the students to gain meaningful field experience related to their future careers. The three-hour block of credit will require a minimum of ten hours of work per week during a fall or spring term, fifteen hours per week in summer, within the host agencies in addition to any written work or reading assignments. See requirements for the B.A. degree in Criminology for the number of hours required. Senior standing; PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3621, CCJ 3117 and CI.. S/U only. No more than 9 hours of CCJ 4940 will be accepted toward the elective hours required for the major.
CDA 3101 Computer Organization for Information Technology 3 HM EIT Elements of the computer are discussed in terms of the physical and conceptual design of memory, processors, busses and I/O elements. Organization of the system is cast in a meta-language that captures the logical and physical nature of the computer. PR: Any Physics course and CGS 3303, or CI.
CEN 3040 Integrated Development Environments (Eclipse) 3 HM EIT This course focuses on the use of the Eclipse IDE for developing Java applications. Students will also learn how to take advantage of the plug-in architecture of Eclipse. PR: COP 2250
CEN 3722 Human-Computer Interface for Information Technology 3 HM EIT Human-Computer Interface is the study of people, computer technology and the ways these influence each other. The basic foundations of HCI in terms of psychology, computer systems and their integration into design practice are discussed in the course. None
CEN 4020 Software Engineering 3 EN ESB An overview of software engineering techniques for producing high quality software. Student will participate in a software development team. PR: COP 4530
CEN 4031 Software Engineering Concepts for Information Technology 3 AS EIT Concepts associated with production of high quality software through the use of software engineering concepts and practices are covered. In addition to conceptual presentations, students are required to participate in software development team projects. PR: EEL 4854 or CI
CGS 2100 Computers in Business 3 BU QMB A study of the use and impact of computers in all areas of business organizations. Course includes hands-on experience and the use of software packages for business analysis. None
CGS 3303 IT Concepts 3 AS EIT A lecture and problem solving course which deals with subjects related to computers and information technology. A broad range of conceptual and practical topics in IT are covered. PR: Any PHY course
CGS 3373 IT Concepts & Data Networking  3 HM EIT The course will act as a breadth-first view of Informatics, including computing
technology fundamentals and networking concepts. The major concepts are
presented in a manner that will make clear the “big picture” of the discipline.
CR: CGS 3373L; Must be taken with co-requisite CGS 3373L
CGS 3373L IT Concepts & Data Networking Lab 1 HM EIT CGS 3373L, IT Concepts and Data Networking, is a laboratory course in support of CGS3373. It consists of 6 lab problems on topics related to network setup, testing, and routing, including static and dynamic packet routing over IP Networks. CR: CGS 3373; Must be taken with co-requisite CGS 3373
CGS 3374 Computer Architecture & Operating Systems 3 HM EIT The course provides a comprehensive and integrated understanding of computer
functions. It combines both computer hardware organization and supporting
operating systems structures to enhance the students’ problem solving skills.
PR: CGS 3373, CR: CGS 3374L; Must be taken with co-requisite CGS 3374L
CGS 3374L Computer Architecture & Operating Systems Lab 1 HM EIT Computer Architecture & OS Lab reinforces students’ understanding of computer functions by performing lab experiments with several OSs.  Broader technical understanding as well as problem solving skills are gained by playing with these software structures PR: CGS 3373, CR: CGS 3374; Must be taken with co-requisite CGS 3374
CGS 3845 Electronic Commerce 3 AS EIT An overview of how E-Commerce evolved, what EC is; how it is being conducted and managed; its major opportunities, issues, and risks. Discussions include: The Internet, intranets, firewalls, etc. Exercises will use various Web and software and packages. PR: COP 2510 or equivalent
CGS 3847 Advanced e-Commerce 3 HM EIT The course guides students in developing a fully functioning e-Commerce website. PR: COP 4834
CGS 3850 Web Development: JavaScript & jQuery 3 HM EIT JavaScript is used to develop interactive Web pages/sites. OO language, with its dynamic functionality, is quickly inserted into a Web page. Used on WWW it is the most popular programming language worldwide & is the basis for the jQuery Library. PR: CGS 3853
CGS 3853 IT Web Design (HTML/xhtml, CSS) 3 AS EIT An overview of how the Internet and the WWW evolved, and how Electronic Commerce is supported by web pages. The student will do exercises relative to HTML, and how browsers show that code. The student will also learn to use web page development packages. PR: COP 2510 or equivalent (USFSM equivalent COP 2030)
CGS 4855 Intermediate Web Development (jQuery) 3 HM EIT This course provides more practical and professional tools for working with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript using the jQuery and the jQuery UI (User Interface) libraries. PR: CGS 3850
CGS 4856 Intermediate Web Design (HTML5) 3 HM EIT This course continues from the first courses in Web Design and Web Development to add the new concepts and capabilities of HTML5. PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, CGS 3850, CGS 3853
CGS 4857 Android Web Applications (w/HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript) 3 AM EIT A mobile web application is one built with core client web technologies.Students
will learn to develop designs for mobile devices; these will also work as
desktop web apps if the browser uses the same versions of technologies (HTML5,
CSS3, JavaScript).
PR: CGS 3853, CGS 3850, CGS 4856
CHM 2045 General Chemistry I 3 AS CHM Principles and applications of chemistry including properties of substances and
reactions, thermochemistry, atomic-molecular structure and bonding, periodic
properties of elements and compounds
PR: 550 SAT Quantitative score or completion of MAC 1105 College Algebra with a C or better AND one year of high school chemistry or completion of CHM 2023 with a grade of C or better. SMNS
CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Lab 1 AS CHM Principles and applications of chemistry including solutions, chemical
thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and
nuclear chemistry.
PR: CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L with a C or better or equivalent
CHM 2046 General Chemistry II 3 AS CHM Principles and applications of chemistry including solutions, chemical
thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and
nuclear chemistry
PR: CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L with a C or better or equivalent SMNS
CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 AS CHM Laboratory portion of General Chemistry II. Continuation of chemistry laboratory. PR: CHM 2045L
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 3 AS CHM Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Lecture. PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L with a C or better
CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 2 AS CHM Laboratory portion of Organic Chemistry I. Introduction of organic laboratory principles and techniques. Lec.-lab. CP: CHM 2200 or CHM 2210
CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II 3 AS CHM Continuation of organic chemistry. PR: CHM 2210 with a C or better
CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 2 AS CHM Continuation of organic chemistry laboratory. PR: CHM 2210L; CR: CHM 2211
CIS 3201 Laws and Legal Aspects of IT 3 HM EIT The course provides an overview of rights, responsibilities, and liabilities
associated with IT systems today. Statutes, case histories, regulations, etc.
will be discussed, to understand and control risk. Research topics will be
assigned to students.
PR: CIS 3360 with a minimum grade of B-
CIS 3303 Unified Modeling Language 3 HM EIT The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a world-class visual language for analysis and design of object-oriented systems. This course examines the various graphical tools and their applications in the context of extended case studies. Working knowledge of an Object-Oriented programming language (not Visual Basic).
CIS 3360 Principles of Information Security 3 AS EIT Board review of Information Security and related elements. Includes terminology, history of the discipline, overview of information security program management. Suitable for IS, criminal justice, political science, accounting information systems students None
CIS 3362 Cryptography and Information Security 3 AS EIT This course examines classical cryptography, entropy, stream and block ciphers, public key versus symmetric cryptography, one-way and trap-door functions, plus other specific tools and techniques in popular use. PR: MAD 2104 or permission of instructor
CIS 3367 Architecting Operating System Security 3 AS EIT This course examines tools and techniques for securing Windows and Linux operating systems. Students will acquire knowledge and skills to perform audit assessments and implement enterprise-wide operating system security. PR: CIS 3360 or permission of instructor
CIS 3615 Secure Software Development 3 HM EIT Information is power. It also has value. Thus, there is an incentive for unscrupulous individuals to steal information. This course covers a number of different techniques to help developers to build enterprise-level systems that are secure and safe. PR: COP 3515 and COP 4260
CIS 3932 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
CIS 4203 Computer Forensics & Investigations 3 HM EIT Teaches the methods of acquiring, preserving, retrieving, and presenting data that have been processed electronically and stored on computer media for use in legal proceedings. Focus on MS Windows systems. PR: COP 2030 and MAD 2104
CIS 4204 Ethical Hacking 3 HM EIT Provides an understanding of computing, networking, exploitation techniques, used for IT security. In testing, a legal ethical hacker tries to penetrate a system, finds its weakest link and analyzes ways to correct security flaws. PR: COP 2030 and MAD 2104
CIS 4253 IT Ethics 3 AS EIT This course will cover issues that arise from the world of online communication and its impact on our daily lives through education, processes, and information. Class discussions cover various technologies and issues that are shaping our society. Basic computer skills 6AC, MW
CIS 4361 Information Technology Security Management 3 AS EIT An overview of information security management techniques and concerns is presented. Topics include: Access control systems, telecommunications and network security, security management practices, application and systems development security, cryptography, disaster recovery planning, legal and ethical issues, and physical security. Junior standing or above
CIS 4365 Computer Security Policies and Disaster Preparedness 3 AS EIT When an organization’s functioning is interrupted by disasters, accidents, or natural events, a loss of data and/or productivity may occur. The impact on the organization is determined by how prepared it is for dealing with these disruptions. PR: CIS 3360
CIS 4368 Database Security and Audits 3 HM EIT An in-depth look at database security concepts and auditing techniques. Hands-on approach when examining security techniques. Examines different security strategies and advancements in implementation as well as problem solving. PR: COP 3718
CIS 4369 Web Application Security 3 HM EIT This is a comprehensive overview of Web applications and their common vulnerabilities. Web Goat will be used to give students pseudo practical experience with penetration testing tools and to give them concrete examples of the concepts of the class. Students are expected to know the basics of HTML, JavaScript, and related technologies – this is a technical class.
CIS 4412 Information Technology Resource Management 3 AS EIT An overview of the information resource management function, with emphasis on information systems management, is covered. Topics include planning, organizing and controlling user services, managing information system development process, and the fundamentals of EDP auditing. Junior standing or above
CIS 4510 I.T. Project Management 3 AS EIT This course covers the general aspects of project management and emphasizes the important, special considerations which apply to information technology projects. Supporting software is used extensively. CI
CIS 4512 IT Project Risk Management 3 HM EIT This course addresses the risks associated with the IT/Business environment. Risk Management plays a key role in the successful development and implementation of IT projects. PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4514 Requirements-Led PM/PM Software Tools 3 HM EIT This course focuses on an innovative approach to using project requirements to
manage the project development life cycle.
PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4515 Managing Global Remote Teams 3 HM EIT Global/telecommuting teams deal with tough issues like isolation, lost emails, miscommunication, time zones, lack of face-to-face interactions, travel budget restrictions, and cultural differences which potentially impede productivity and effectiveness. PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4518 Quality Issues in Project Management 3 HM EIT This course explains concepts & principles of tenets of quality management
& practical methodologies to implement them. It covers little q & big Q;
addresses thinking, misconceptions & alternative theories, focusing on big Q
to build a case for change.
PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4524 IT Project Schedule & Cost Control 3 HM EIT Students will develop fundamental skills in estimating, scheduling, cost control, and reporting, essential for successful information technology projects. PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4525 Contract Management & Negotiations 3 HM EIT Today’s dynamic performance-based work environment requires partnerships and alliances to obtain a marketable mix of skills, tools and business practices. The course covers key aspects of contract negotiation planning, documenting and closing contracts PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4900 Independent Study In Computer Science 1-5 EN ESB Specialized independent study determined by the needs and interests of the student. PR: COP 4530 or CDA 3201 and CI. S/U only
CIS 4930 Special Topics in Computer Science I 1-3 EN ESB PR: COP 4530 or CDA 3201 and CI
CIS 4932 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
CIS 4935 Senior Project in Information Technology 3-5 AS EIT Graduates of the IT program must complete a major project dealing with a sub-domain of IT. Projects are supervised by a faculty member, or an approved industrial mentor. Projects range from design to programming, to implementations associated with IT. Senior Standing in Information Technology SMCC
CJC 4010 American Correctional Systems 3 BC CJP Analysis of the different treatment philosophies and techniques currently in use in the field, with special attention to experimental and demonstration programs. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117 or CI
CJC 4166 Alternatives to Incarceration 3 BC CJP This course explores a variety of alternatives to imprisoning the offender, including probation, parole, diversion, and other community-based intervention and treatment approaches. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117 or CI
CJE 3650 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 AP CJP This course provides students an appreciation of ‘real life’ forensic science and its role in the justice system. The class introduces students to the scientific techniques employed by the forensic science community. Not restricted or repeatable. None
CJE 4010 Juvenile Justice System 3 BC CJP Provides coverage of the juvenile and family courts, their clientele, and the complex of human services agencies and facilities that contribute to efforts at juvenile correctional intervention. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117 or CI
CJE 4610 Criminal Investigation 3 BC CJP Covers the major components of criminal investigation, with special attention to the scientific aspects of criminal investigation and the management of major cases. PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117 or CI
CJL 3110 Substantive Criminal Law 3 BC CJP Examines the historical basis of the American criminal law system, the substantive elements of the crime, and court procedures. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, or CI
CJL 3502 Introduction to Courts 3 AP CJP Offers understanding of process & functions of US court system. Define & identify different aspects of law & crime; examine aspects of Federal & State court systems; trial process; examine roles of court workers; sentencing. Not restricted or repeatable. None
CJL 4115 Environmental Law and Crime 3 BC CJP The course provides students with an introduction to issues in the area of environmental crime and environmental law. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CI
CJL 4410 Criminal Rights and Procedures 3 BC CJP Emphasizes the Constitutional issues and rules that are applied and enforced by the courts while processing criminal cases. Junior standing; PR: CCJ 3024 or CI
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 AS PSY Descriptions, theoretical explanations, research evidence, and treatment of maladaptive behavior. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
CLP 4414 Behavior Modification 3 AS PSY Introduction to behavior analysis, and application of learning principles, behavioral measurement, research designs, and interventions in treatment settings. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
CLP 4433 Psychological Tests and Measurement 3 AS PSY A consideration of the instruments for intellectual and personality assessment including their applications, development, and potential abuses. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI. Students may not receive credit for both CLP 4433 and EDF 4430
CNT 3403 Network Security and Firewalls 3 AS EIT This course surveys network security standards and emphasizes applications that are widely used on the Internet and for corporate networks. This course also examines Firewalls and related tools used to provide both network and perimeter security. PR: EEL 4782
COM 3110 Communication For Business and the Professions 3 AS SPE Identification of communication situations specific to business and the professions. Analysis of variables related to communication objectives and preparation of oral presentations in the form of informational reports, conference management, persuasive communications, interviews, and public hearings. None
COP 2030 Programming Concepts I 3 HM EIT This course covers basic programming concepts using the Python language for implementation and developing problem solving skills. None
COP 2250 Object-Oriented Programming (Java SE) 3 HM EIT This course introduces students to object-oriented programming concepts using Java but via a specially designed Integrated Development Environment (BlueJ). This enables students to directly create objects of any class to interact with their methods. None
COP 2700 Database Systems Basics 3 HM EIT Database systems are described with particular emphasis on Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS). SQLite is the target RDBMS. It is programmatically driven with the Python language and OpenOffice base. PR: COP 2030
COP 2930 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Special topics course. None
COP 2931 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Special topics course. None
COP 3259 Comprehensive Java 3 HM EIT The focus of this course is the comprehensive Java 6 SE specification which defines the advanced Java language features and capabilities. PR: COP 2250
COP 3375 Data Structures and Algorithms w/Python 3 HM EIT This course focuses on the Python language and covers its features and
capabilities in depth.
PR: COP 2030, CR: COP 3375L; Must be taken with co-requisite COP 3375L
COP 3375L Data Structures and Algorithms w/Python Lab 1 HM EIT COP 3375L Data Structures & Algorithms is a laboratory course in support of COP 3375 which consists of 8-10 Computer Laboratory programs on problem-solving and programming skills related to basic data structures, concepts and performance issues. PR: COP 2030, CR: COP 3375; Must be taken with co-requisite COP 3375
COP 3415 Data Structures and Algorithms 3 HM EIT This course is intended to be a first course on data structures and algorithms, implemented using the Python language. As such it deals with abstract data types and data structures. It also deals with writing algorithms and problem solving. PR: COP 3375
COP 3515 Program Design for Information Technology 3 AS EIT Concepts associated with the design and implementation of computer programs are studied, with emphasis on creation of programs to be developed and maintained in a variety of environments from small to large information technology organizations. PR: COP 2510 or CI
COP 3718 Intermediate Database System 3 HM EIT This course provides an in-depth treatment of working with Relational Database Management System (DBMS), with particular reference to MySQL. It also shows how to interface with MySQL using both PHP and Java languages. PR: COP 2700
COP 3722 Advanced Database Systems Design 3 HM EIT This course presents contemporary data modeling and database design techniques in a vendor-neutral manner. Students will learn to create conceptual, logical, and physical data models, specialized techniques for handling temporal and analytical data. PR: COP 2700 and COP 3718
COP 3931 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. PR: CEN 3040
COP 4260 Systems Programming: JavaEE 3 HM EIT This course covers Java EE, the Enterprise Java Platform. Java EE is a super-set of Java SE. This platform has matured to a degree where it can be both complete and lightweight, while, at the same time incorporating many new and enhanced tools. PR: COP 2250
COP 4376 Java-Based Python (Jython) 3 HM EIT Focus is on the Python language as used with the Jython (Java-based) interpreter
in a Java EE environment – Python enables the best of two worlds by bridging
between the elegant, expressive code of the Python world and the “enterprise
ready” Java world.
PR: COP 3259 and COP 3375
COP 4610 Operating Systems for Information Technology 3 AS EIT Introduction to concepts and practices of modern operating systems. Topics include process, parallelism, memory management, resource allocation and file systems. Algorithms are used to understand many of the concepts associated with operating systems. PR: EEL 4854 or CI
COP 4610L Operating Systems Laboratory for Information Technology 1 AS EIT Implementation and evaluation of models discussed in the lecture part of the course. Students implement operating system algorithms in stand-alone mode, and modify real operating system code. Students implement and test algorithms in a lab environment. PR: EEL 4854 or CI
COP 4xxx Mobile Development with Android 3 HM EIT This course provides the beginning programmer with a strong foundation necessary to build mobile applications for Android devices. PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, COP 3375
COP 4703 Database Systems for Information Technology 3 AS EIT Fundamentals of database management systems are presented, covering relational, CODASYL, network, hierarchical, and object-oriented models. Topics include basic design concepts, analysis of efficiency as well as actual implementations of such systems. PR: EEL 4854 or CI
COP 4710 Database Design 3 EN ESB This course covers the fundamentals and applications of database management
systems, including data models, relational database design, query languages, and web-based database applications.
PR:COP 4530
COP 4814 Web Services 3 AS EIT The Web services model, based on the Open Standards of SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, is studied and applied. CI
COP 4816 XML Applications 3 AS EIT This course introduces extensible Markup Language (XML), a technology for exchanging structured information over the Internet, and examines a sampling of its many applications. CI. Completion of prerequisites for admission to IT program
COP 4834 Data-Driven Web Sites 3 AS EIT This course builds on students’ knowledge of Web development and databases by adding server-side scripting using the PHP language to interact with the mySQL database system to build transaction processing and report generating systems over the Internet. CI. Completion of prerequisites for admission to IT program. Junior standing or above
COP 4854 Rich Internet Applications 3 HM EIT This capstone course introduces needed technologies in the context of applications to explain links with one another. A number of tools (captured under Rich Internet Applications) are needed to make all of these existing technologies work together. PR: CGS 3850, CGS 3853, COP 4816
COP 4930 Information Technology Seminar 1-3 AS EIT A survey of current Information Technology topics are covered to keep the IT student abreast of the variety of domains associated with their major. Speakers with a wide variety of IT experience will give seminars to senior IT students. Senior standing in Information Technology
COP 4931 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 AS POL Comparison and analysis of representative European and non-Western political systems. None SS
CTS 3165 Linux Essentials 3 HM EIT This course describes installation and configuration of Ubuntu Linux as a powerful desktop workstation capable of competing with the leading desktop operating system, but at a much lower cost. A wide variety of applications are installed to cover many areas. None
CTS 4348 Linux Administration 3 HM EIT The course provides the breadth and depth of material necessary to effectively implement and manage Linux servers in real-world business environments. PR: CTS 3165 (Request permit for waiver of pre-requisite)
CTS 4805 Web Development Tools 3 AS EIT This course builds on web design concepts and extends them to build and maintain complete Web Sites using the current de facto industry-standard integrated web site development environment/applications. CI
DEP 2004 The Life Cycle 3 BC GEY An examination of individuals and the physical, cognitive, personality, and social changes which occur throughout the entire life span. None SMSS
DEP 4053 Developmental Psychology 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations in the study of human development. CP: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
ECO 1000 Basic Economics 3 BU ECN Survey of economic principles and issues. Scarcity, choice, markets, prices, the monetary system, unemployment, inflation, international trade and finance. No credit after completing either ECO 2023 or ECO 2013 SS
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 BU ECN ECO 2013 introduces students to basic economic terminology, definitions and measurements of macroeconomic data, simple macroeconomic models, fiscal and monetary policy, and international macroeconomic linkages. None SMSS, SS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 BU ECN Introduction to the theory of price determination. How an economy decides what to produce, how to produce, and how to distribute goods and services. None SMSS, SS
ECO 3101 Intermediate Price Theory 3 BU ECN The price system and allocation of scarce resources between competing uses. May not receive credit for both ECP 3703 and ECO 3101. PR: ECO 2023 and MAC 2233 or MAC 2311 or equivalent
ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 BU ECN Determination of income, employment, prices, and interest rates. Aggregate demand and aggregate supply. PR: ECO 2013 and ECO 3101 or ECP 3703 with a grade of “C” or better and MAC 2233 or MAC 2311 or equivalent
EDE 4xxx The Learning Environment 3 EM EDE This course covers the practical, theoretical, and ethical aspects of the learning environment, including the current knowledge of best practices of a variety of management strategies and methods appropriate for a diverse elementary classroom setting. PR: EDE 4947, RED 4310, EEX 4084, MAE 4310; CR: EDE 4xxx (4948)
EDE 4223 Creative Experiences for the Child 3 ED EDE Provides students with critical understanding of visual arts, music, movement, and drama in K-6 curriculum. Students will develop knowledge and strategies to incorporate creative expression into integrated curriculum. Restricted to majors. Not repeatable. Acceptance into College of Education.
EDE 4301 Classroom Management, School Safety, Ethics, Law and Elementary Methods 3 ED EDE This course examines the legal issues affecting classroom/school management, school safety, professional ethics and elementary school methods. The course explores the current knowledge of best practices of a variety of teaching and management strategies and methods deemed appropriate for a diverse elementary classroom setting including ESOL students and other exceptionalities. Admission to the program in the Department of Childhood Education
EDE 4323 Planning for Instruction of Diverse Learners 3 EM EDE This course will explore various theoretical and philosophical beliefs regarding effective instruction. Students will plan rigorous, integrated lessons inclusive of national & state standards & benchmarks while meeting diverse learners’ needs. PR: EDE 4223, EDF 3604, EDF 3122, TSL 4240; CR: EDE 4947
EDE  4947 Clinical Education I 3 EM EDE Students will work in an elementary classroom for 6 hours per week of student contact time throughout the semester, learning to plan and instruct pupils and begin to understand the structure and operation of the school. PR: EDE 4223, EEX 4084, EDF 3122, TSL 4240; CR: EDE 4323; Field Experiences are to be approved by the Dean or designee.
EDE 4xxx Clinical Education II 6 EM EDE Students will teach in an assigned elementary school for 14 weeks. Candidates/mentors assess their teaching abilities and personal attributes necessary to the profession through a process of dialogue and reflection. PR: EDE 4947, EDE 4323, MAE 4310, RED 4310, RED 4311; CR: EDE 4xxx; Field Experiences are to be approved by the Dean or designee.
EDE 4xxx Clinical Education III 9-12  EM EDE The teacher candidate is required to demonstrate professional competencies during one semester of full day internship in a public elementary school.  Candidates are expected to perform all teaching duties and responsibilities including a weekly seminar. PR: EDE 4xxx, all required state tests, and applicable programmatic requirements
EDF 2005 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 3 ED EDC Introductory survey course required for admission into the College of Education. A broad overview of the history, sociology and philosophy of education in the United States focuses on education as a field of study and teaching as a profession. Includes lecture and field experience. None
EDF 2085 Introduction to Diversity for Educators 3 ED EDC Introductory survey course required for admission into the College of Education. Places schools and teaching within the context of the U.S. as a pluralistic society. Topics include: the demographics of diversity; prejudice; elements of culture; American heritage of diversity and its value; and barriers to cultural understanding. Includes lecture and field experience. PR: EDF 2005
EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child 3 ED EDF Preadolescent child growth and development, learning theory, and behavioral analysis applied to instruction and to the organization and management of classroom. General psychology and admission to College of Education
EDF 3604 Schools and Society 3 ED EDF Social, economic and political context within which schools function and the values which provide direction for our schools. Upper level standing SMCD, 6AC, MW
EDF 4111 Child Growth and Learning 3 ED EDF An introduction to child development and learning from an educational and psychological perspective. Emphasis is on the application of relevant constructs as they would reflect developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood learning settings. None
EDF 4430 Measurement For Teachers 3 ED EDQ Concepts and skills related to designing and developing classroom tests; evaluating tests, instruction, and student progress; and communicating student achievement. Including application of performance assessment techniques and computer applications for measuring and assessing pupil progress. Upper level standing
EDG 4909 Directed Studies 1-4 ED EDC To extend competency in teaching field. Senior standing. Offered only as a scheduled class. DPR
EDG 4934 Final Intern Seminar 1 EP EDE The Seminar provides a ongoing continuous improvement activities throughout the full time student teaching experience. It also provides opportunities for the candidates to examine their experiences in their student teaching classroom settings. Achieve passing scores on the GKT. CR: EDG 4944
EEC 4303 Creative and Affective Experiences for Young Children 3 ED EDU Develops students’ understandings of young children’s creative expression through art, music, movement, play and drama. Emphasizes how to plan, implement, and evaluate appropriate learning experiences as well as selection of appropriate instructional materials. Admission to College of Education. Early Childhood majors only
EEC 4307 Cognitive Experiences for Young Children 3 ED EDU Emphasizes theoretical and practical aspects of cognitive development for children ages 3 through 6 with focus on planning integrated experiences and content in science, mathematics, and social sciences. Admission to College of Education; PR: EDF 4111; Early Childhood majors only.
EEC 4408 Child, Family & Teacher Relations 3 ED EDU Focuses on developing an understanding of traditional and non-traditional families, structural and life style variations and parenting in diverse cultures and at-risk families. Implications from these understandings will guide development of a parent involvement plan that includes effective ways to communicate with parents, conference with parents, and plan parent meetings and home visits. Admission to College of Education; PR: EDF 4111; Early Childhood majors only
EEC 4936 Senior Seminar in Elementary Early Childhood Education 3 ED EDU Synthesis of teacher candidate’s courses in complete college program. Admission to the Early Childhood ED Program. CR: EEC 4940
EEC 4940 Internship: Early Childhood 10 ED EDU Teacher candidate is required to demonstrate professional competencies during one semester of full-day internship in a public or private elementary school. PR: EEC 4936. S/U only
EEL 4782 Computer Information Networks for Information Technology 3 AS EIT The course covers concepts of computer networks. Physical and logical structures are presented. Physical media, circuit switching, data flow, high-level protocols, and the ISO model are discussed. Bus, ring, star, and wireless topologies are presented. None
EEL 4782L Information Networks Laboratory for Information Technology 1 AS EIT The lab section of this course will allow students to apply hardware and software concepts discussed in the lecture portion of the class. Special isolated networking labs provide both software and hardware tools for student experimentation. PR: COP 4610 or CI
EEL 4854 Data Structures and Algorithms for Information Technology 3 AS EIT Representing data for manipulation by the computer is studied. Design and analysis of well-known data structures and algorithms to manipulate them, are studied. Program efficiency, clarity and speed are considered in various structures and algorithms. PR: COP 3515 or CI
EEX 4012 Foundations of Special Education 3 ED EDS Characteristics and needs of children who have learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, hearing impairments, mental retardation, physical handicaps, speech impairments, visual limitations, and who are gifted and talented. DPR
EEX 4054 Perspectives on Learning and Behavioral Differences 3 ED EDS The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the historical and theoretical perspectives on educating students with learning and behavioral differences, develop a critical understanding of current practices in service delivery systems, and examine professional issues and trends that impact the future of the field. PR: EEX 4012
EEX 4084 Instruction for Exceptional and Diverse Students 3 EM EDE Teacher candidates will review the concepts of differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and inclusionary classroom practices for exceptional and diverse students with an emphasis on using arts integration. None
EEX 4221 Educational Assessment of Exceptional Students 3 ED EDS Introduction to assessment of exceptional students through formal and informal techniques. Emphasis placed on the interpretation of information for educational programming and individualization of instruction. PR: EDF 3214, EDF 4430 and EEX 4012. CR: EEX 4941 and EEX 4894. DPR
EEX 4243 Education of Exceptional Adolescents and Adults 3 ED EDS Procedures for implementing educational programs for exceptional adolescents and adults. Topics include service delivery, curriculum, academic remediation, advocacy, utilization of ancillary services, alternative programs and community resources. PR: EEX 4012 or equivalent or DPR
EEX 4604 Behavior Management for Special Needs and At-Risk Students 3 ED EDS Techniques to prevent, analyze, and manage challenging and disruptive classroom behavior as well as teaching social skills. PR: EEX 4012, DPR. CR: EEX 4941, ELD 4941, or EMR 4941
EEX 4742 Narrative Perspectives on Exceptionality: Cultural and Ethical Issues 3 ED EDS This course is designed to offer students a meaningful way to interpret and understand exceptionalities. None 6AC, LW
EEX 4894 Clinical Teaching in Special Education 3 ED EDS Effective teaching principles, instructional management procedures, and specialized teaching techniques for exceptional students. PR: EEX 4012, DPR. CR: EEX 4941
EEX 4936 Senior Seminar in Exceptional Student Education 1 ED EDS Synthesis of teacher candidate’s courses in complete college program. Senior standing; CR: EEX 4940. Required concurrently with internship
EEX 4940 Internship: Exceptional Student Education 1-12 ED EDS One full semester of internship in an accredited public or private school. PR: EEX 4936. S/U only
EEX 4941 Practicum in Exceptional Student Education 1-4 ED EDS Designed to provide teacher candidates with carefully planned and supervised clinical experiences with exceptional students populations in a variety of settings. Candidates demonstrate the ability to apply concepts, theories and research. Repeatable up to six credit hours. Sem I: EEX 4012; Sem II: EEX 4604; Sem III: EEX 4221 and EEX 4894
EEX 5752 Working With Families: A Pluralistic Perspective 3 ED EDS The impact of the socio/cultural environment on the education of at-risk children and children with disabilities; family systems theory, principles of multi-cultural education, strategies for working effectively with families of school-age children, diverse cultures and family structures represented in school populations today. Introductory course in special education, GS.
EME 2040 Introduction to Technology for Educators 3 ED EDK Designed as an introduction to computer technology and its role in teaching and learning processes. Topics include educational software, ethical and social issues, hardware, interactive multimedia, models for integrating technology into instruction, productivity tools and telecommunications. None
EME 5403 Computers in Education 3 ED EDK A survey course designed to introduce practicing teachers to microcomputer technology and its function in the classroom to augment the teaching and learning processes. Objectives include the use and evaluation of educational software, classroom use of computers, instructional computing research, generic applications software (word processors, database managers, etc.), programming, disk operating systems, and microcomputer hardware. None
EMR 4011 Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities 3 ED EDS This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to the area of mental retardation and developmental disabilities with particular emphasis on the educational aspects. This course is required by the State for certification in mental retardation. PR: EEX 4012 or equivalent
ENC 1101 Composition I 3 AS ENG ENC 1101 helps prepare students for academic work by emphasizing expository writing, the basics of library research, and the conventions of academic discourse. College-level reading and writing SMCO, 6AC, EC
ENC 1102 Composition II 3 AS ENG ENC 1102 emphasizes argument, research, and style. As students engage in creative and critical thinking, they learn to support assertions based on audience and purpose; students apply library research, strategies for revision, and peer response. PR: ENC 1101 (or the equivalent, i.e. passing the CLEP exam). SMCO, 6AC, EC
ENC 2210 Technical Writing 3 AS ENG Effective presentation of technical and semi-technical information. Will not
count toward the English major
PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 6AC
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 AS ENG The study of the range of possible careers for technical communicators with special emphasis on the issues that professional writers face in various workplace contexts and on the skills needed in word processing. PR: ENC 1101 & 1102 or ENC 1121
ENC 3246 Communication for Engineers 3 AS ENG Focuses on writing concerns of engineers. Deals with the content, organization, format, and style of specific types of engineering documents. Provides opportunity to improve oral presentations. None 6AC
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 AS ENG The course is an introduction to the techniques and types of professional writing, including correspondence and reports. It is designed to help strengthen skills of effective business and professional communication in both oral and written modes. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or ENC 1121 and ENC 1122. 6AC
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 AS ENG This is a course that teaches the techniques for writing effective prose, (excluding fiction), in which student essays are extensively criticized, edited, and discussed in individual sessions with the instructor and with peers. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 6AC
ENC 3416 New Media for Technical Communication 3 AS ENG The study and production of digital media with special emphasis on emergent and evolving applications. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4212 Professional & Technical Editing 3 AM ENG This course helps students meet professional and technical editing challenges in
the workplace. Assignments concern research, interviewing, writing, editing, and the technology needed for successful results. Unrestricted to majors, not
repeatable.
PR: At least one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, ENC 4906, ENC 4946, ENC 4268, ENC 4311 or CI
ENC 4218 Visual Rhetoric for Technical Communication 3 AS ENG The study and production of visual rhetoric with special emphasis on print and digital document design and technical graphics. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 AS ENG Advanced Technical Writing is a course designed to develop writing skills of a high order: technical exposition; technical narration, description, and argumentation; graphics; proposals; progress reports; physical research reports; and feasibility reports. PR: ENC 2210, or ENC 3310, or CI
ENC 4264 Managerial Communications 3 AM ENG This course is designed to strengthen written, oral, and non-verbal skills in the context of managerial communication tasks. The course presents communication skills as integral to management strategy and as vital to workplace success. Non-restricted to majors. PR: Any one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4311, ENC 4260
ENC 4268 Senior Seminar in Professional & Technical Writing (PTW) 3 AM ENG This course helps students consolidate learning from previous BTW courses to
prepare for professional employment by performing advanced assignments guided by professional mentors and instructor. Required course, not repeatable.
PR: ENC 4946; senior standing SMCC
ENC 4311 Advanced Composition 3 AS ENG Instruction and practice in writing effective, lucid, and compelling prose, with special emphasis on style, logical argumentation, and critical thinking. PR: ENC 3310 or CI
ENC 4906 Professional & Technical Writing (PTW) Independent Study 3 AM ENG This course focuses on such individually chosen topics as communications crisis
management and PR strategy through written assignments, selected readings, and in-person or online meetings. Not restricted to majors; may be repeated for credit.
PR: Any two of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4209, ENC 4212, ENC 4260, ENC 4264, ENC 4311 or CI.
ENC 4931 Selected Topics in Professional and Technical Writing 3 AS ENG Focus of the course will be determined by student demand and instructor interest. Topics to be covered may include legal writing, the conventions of business writing, writing in the medical fields, and writing for the social sciences. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. PR: ENC 3250, ENC 2210, or ENC 3310 or CI
ENC 4946 Professional & Technical Writing (PTW) Internship 3 AM ENG This course is a custom-designed BTW internship in which a student works with a company or organization on real-world communications assignments under the guidance of a supervisor. Restricted to majors; may not be repeated for credit. PR: ENC 3242 and COM 3110; Student must have an approved application and approved formal internship agreement.
ENG 3014 Introduction to Literary Methodology 3 AS ENG This course prepares English majors and minors with the basic critical and technical skills and understanding for subsequent literary study in 3000- and 4000-level courses towards the major. Substantial writing. Required of LIT majors. Recommended during first 2 semesters of LIT major. PR: ENC 1101, ENG 1102
ENG 4013 Literary Criticism 3 AS ENG A study of the works of major literary critics from Aristotle to the present, with emphasis on their meaning, their implied world view, and their significance for our own time and literature. Required for Literature majors. Recommended before 4000-level literature courses. None
ENG 4060 History of the English Language 3 AS ENG The evolution of language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English to Modern
English. Development of the English lexicon. Changes in the pronunciation,
syntactic, and semantic systems; discussion of the forms which influenced them.
None
ENG 4674 Film and Culture 3 AS ENG Students will be introduced to key concepts and techniques of Film Studies, including the history of film; an examination of film genres; an overview of foreign cinema; and the study of issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality. Junior/Senior Standing 6AC, MW, LW
ENG 4906 Individual Research 1-4 AS ENG Directed study in special projects. CC
ENG 4907 Directed Reading 3 AS ENG Readings in special topics. CC
ENG 4934 Senior Literature Seminar 3 AM ENG The Senior Literature Seminar will be the capstone course for literature majors, emphasizing the degree-program outcomes. Students will develop and synthesize the knowledge and skills gained in the literature major, as they will explore a specific topic, which will vary. This is a required course for English majors. PR: ENG 4013, senior registration status. SMCC
ENL 3015 British Literature to 1616 3 AS ENG A survey of representative prose, poetry, and drama from its beginnings through the Renaissance, including such poems and figures as “Beowulf”, Chaucer, Malory, More, Hooker, Skelton, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson. None
ENL 3016 Studies in 17th and 18th Century British Literature 3 AS ENG This is a topics course focusing on 17th and 18th century British literature. It satisfies a historical distribution requirement for the English major, LIT, and may be taken more than once for credit. None
ENL 3230 British Literature 1616-1780 3 AS ENG A survey of 17th Century and Neoclassical Literature, including such figures as Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Boswell, and Goldsmith. None
ENL 3251 British Literature 1780-1900 3 AS ENG The poetry and poetics of the Romantic figures, with attention to the continuing importance of Romantic thinking in contemporary affairs and letters; a survey of representative figures of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, including poetry, prose, and drama. None
ENL 3273 British Literature 1900-1945 3 AS ENG Survey of poetry, drama, and fiction of such writers as Eliot, Yeats, Thomas, Conrad, Shaw, Joyce, Lawrence, Huxley, Woolf, Forster, Waugh, Owen, Auden, O’Casey, and others. None
ENL 3331 Early Shakespeare 3 AS ENG A study of from five to eight of Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, and early tragedies, ending with Hamlet. Special attention to developing the student’s ability to read and interpret the text. None
ENL 3332 Late Shakespeare 3 AS ENG A study of from five to eight of Shakespeare’s problem plays, major tragedies, and late romances. Special attention to developing the student’s ability to read and interpret the text. None
ENL 4122 19th Century British Novel 3 AS ENG Study of the 19th-century British novel, including works by novelists such as Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Trollope, and others. Analysis of the characteristics of the novels and their historical, social, cultural, and political contexts. None
ENL 4132 British Novel: Conrad to the Present 3 AS ENG A critical study of British fiction from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on such writers as Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Huxley, Orwell, Burgess, Murdoch, Golding, and others. None
ENL 4303 Selected British Authors 3 AS ENG The study of two or three major figures in British Literature. The course may include such writers as Fielding and Austen, Keats and Yeats, Joyce and Woolf. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. None
ENL 4311 Chaucer 3 AS ENG An intensive study of “The Canterbury Tales” and major critical concerns. None
ENL 4338 Advanced Studies in Shakespeare 3 AS ENG Intensive study of selected plays of Shakespeare, with special attention to significant critical issues and to the Elizabethan and Jacobean cultural setting. PR: ENL 3331 or ENL 3332, or CI
ENL 4341 Milton 3 AS ENG Study of the poetry and major prose of John Milton, with special emphasis on “Paradise Lost”. None
ENL 5137 British Novel 1900 to the Present 3 AM ENL This course provides advanced study of trends and influences in longer British fiction from about 1900 to the present It traces the development of the novel form focusing on works and authors considered to have made major contributions to British fiction. None
ETG 4930 Special Topics in Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
ETG 4931 Special Topics in Technology I 1-3 EN ESB Special Topics in Technology. None
EUH 2011 Ancient History I 3 AS HTY An introductory survey of ancient history. EUH 2011 treats the ancient Near East, Egypt and Greece from the origins of civilization to the Hellenistic kingdoms following the death of Alexander the Great. None HP
EUH 2012 Ancient History II 3 AS HTY An introductory survey of ancient history. EUH 2012 deals with Rome through the Regal, Republican, and Imperial periods, from the beginnings of civilization in Italy to the division of the Roman Empire, A.D. 285. None SMSS, HP, CAHU, HHCP
EUH 2022 The Medieval West 3 AS HTY An introductory survey of medieval history. EUH 2022 examines the European and Mediterranean worlds, exploring the evolution and transformation of beliefs, institutions and social structures, ca. 500-1500. None HP
EUH 2030 Modern European Histiry I 3 AS HTY A thematic survey of Europe in the modern age. EUH 2030 treats the period from
the Renaissance to the French Revolution.
None HP
EUH 2031 Modern European History II 3 AS HTY This course explores the social, political and economic forces which have shaped Europe over the past two hundred and fifty years. None HP
EUH 3142 Renaissance and Reformation 3 AS HTY A history of Europe from the Renaissance to the Thirty Years’ War (1400-1618). The cultural, social, and economic characteristics will provide the framework for artistic, philosophical, religious, and political developments. None
EUH 3181 Medieval Culture 3 AS HTY A survey of thought, culture, and art in the Middle Ages. Medieval attitudes as manifested in literature, art, philosophy, education, and religion; with emphasis upon Medieval man’s changing perception of himself and his world. None
EUH 3188 Medieval Society 3 AS HTY A study of the daily life and attitudes of the medieval nobleman, peasant, townsmen, and the agrarian-urban economy and society which affected their lives. None
EUH 3189 Medieval Politics 3 AS HTY An inquiry into the nature, distribution, and use of political power during the Middle Ages, in such institutions as feudalism, monarchy, cities, and the church. None
EUH 3202 History of 17th and 18th Century Europe 3 AS HTY A history of Europe from the beginning of the Thirty Years’ War to the outbreak of the French Revolution. Political and intellectual developments will be assessed in the light of society and the economy. None
EUH 3205 History of Nineteenth Century Europe 3 AS HTY A comparative study of economic, political, social, and intellectual developments in nineteenth century Europe. None
EUH 3401 Classical Greece 3 AS HTY A study of ancient Greece focusing on the brilliant period following the Persian Wars, but embracing as well the formative Bronze, Middle and Archaic ages, and the decline culminating in the conquest of Greece by Philip II of Macedon in 338 B.C. None
EUH 3402 Age of Alexander 3 AS HTY A study focusing on the career of Alexander the Great and on the Greek and Macedonian conquest of Imperial Persia. Also treated are the great hellenistic kingdoms prior to Rome’s conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. None
EUH 3412 Roman Republic 3 AS HTY A study of the Roman Republic from 509 B.C. to the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B. C., with a prelude treating Rome’s early development under royal rule. Political growth and change provide the framework for the treatment. None
EUH 3413 Roman Empire 3 AS HTY A study of Imperial Roman from the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C. to the death of the emperor Constantine in A.D. 337. Emphasized is Rome’s government of a vast Mediterranean empire including much of the near East and Europe. None
EUH 3501 British History to 1688 3 AS HTY A study of major developments in British history from the 15th century to 1688. None
EUS 3022 Russia 3 AS INT Area study courses are multi-disciplinary in nature and deal with one or more countries of a region. Each course combines some measure of political, economic, historical, religious, geographic, anthropological, and sociological analysis in dealing with salient features and current problems. None SS, ALAMEA
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 AS ESP An introductory lecture course linking the human and physical/biological world. The course will develop an understanding of population and resource interactions. None SMNS, NS
EVR 2001L Environmental Science Lab 1 AS ESP A laboratory course linking the human and physical/biological world. The lab will develop an understanding of population and resource interactions and complement the lecture course. Field trips. None
EVR 2002 Environmental Science: Regional and Global Issues 3 AS ESP Students will learn how the environment functions and how humans, through social, political and economic activities, are creating a degraded, dysfunctional environment. None SMNS, NS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 AS ESP An introduction to environmental policy using class lectures, student projects, and independent readings. Emphasis will be placed on understanding basic policy mechanisms and major policy actions relating to environmental issues at the local, national and international level. None
EXP 4204C Perception 3 AS PSY Topics include sensory and physiological bases of perception and how people process relevant information in their environments. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
EXP 4304 Motivation 3 AS PSY A survey of motivational processes and mechanisms from physiological and psychological viewpoints. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
EXP 4404 Psychology of Learning 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations in conditioning and instrumental learning. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
EXP 4640 Psychology of Language 3 AS PSY Historical survey of relations between psychology and linguistics leading to the emergence of psycholinguistics as a field of study. The current status of theory and research in the field will be covered. PR: PSY 3213
EXP 4680C Cognitive Psychology 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations of human learning, information processing, verbal learning, and judgment and decision-making. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
FIL 2xxx Film and Culture 3 FA ART This course introduces film as an art form and a social/cultural artifact by providing students with an understanding of the technical, theoretical, and ascetic aspects of film production and analysis. None 6AC, SMHU
FIN 2100 Personal Finance 3 BU FIN Survey of the problems and techniques of personal financial planning. Includes consumer credit, insurance, home ownership, and personal investing, with attention given to current economic and legal constraints. Not available for credit to upper-level students who have been admitted to the College of Business. May not be counted toward major requirements in FIN or GBA.
FIN 3233 Money and Banking 3 BU FIN Examines the structure and operations of the U.S. monetary system, commercial banking, central banking, money, and capital markets, and provides an introduction to monetary theory and policy. PR: ECO 2013.
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 BU FIN Study of the processes, decision structures, and institutional arrangements concerned with the use and acquisition of funds by a firm. Includes the management of the asset and liability structure of the firm under certain and risky situations. The financial decision process will include and recognize the international as well as domestic aspects of financial management. PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, and ECO 2023
FIN 3604 International Finance 3 BU FIN Study of factors affecting international business, assessment of risks, international managerial finance, institutions and instruments of international business finance. PR: FIN 3403
FIN 4303 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 BU FIN A study of financial institutions and their roles in the capital markets; includes the savings allocation, investment, and financial decision making processes. PR: FIN 3403
FIN 4414 Advanced Corporation Finance 3 BU FIN An examination of the financial policies of corporations, with special reference to dividend policy, financial structure, capital expenditures, acquisitions, mergers, and reorganizations. PR: FIN 3403
FIN 4443 Financial Policies and Strategies 3 BU FIN A senior seminar for majors in Finance. Primarily a case course examining financial policies and the application of financial analysis to alternative strategies. PR: FIN 4414
FIN 4453 Finance Information Technology 3 BM FIN Students develop an understanding of the data and computer technology resources available for use in analyzing financial markets. Traditional financial models and theories are examined and evaluated via statistical and regression analysis. Non-majors ok. PR: FIN 3403
FIN 4461 Financial Statement Analysis 3 BU FIN Provides an understanding of the relationship between financial statements produced in accordance with GAAP and the informational content such statements provide. After completing the course, the student should have a better understanding of the usefulness of published financial statements to various users in a variety of circumstances. PR: FIN 3404
FIN 4504 Principles of Investments 3 BU FIN Survey of the risks and returns of investment media in relation to the investment objectives of individual and institutional investors. Includes an examination of the capital markets, information flows, and analytical techniques in terms of their impact on the valuation process. PR: ECO 2013 and FIN 3403
FIN 4514 Advanced Investment Analysis and Management 3 BU FIN A comprehensive study of security analysis and portfolio management. The course will utilize a quantitative approach to investment selection and management. PR: FIN 4504
FIN 4915 Independent Research 1-3 BU FIN The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI, CC. Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson
FIN 4934 Selected Topics in Finance 1-3 BU FIN Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson on pertinent finance issues. None
FRE 1120 Beginning French I 4 AS WLE The first course in the study of elementary French. Emphasis on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading. None
FRE 1121 Beginning French II 4 AS WLE A continuation of FRE 1120. PR: FRE 1120 or equivalent.
FRE 4392 African Images in Francophone Film 3 AS WLE This is a film based course and technologically enhanced course which will look at cultural, socio-economic, political and gender issues in French speaking Africa. Course materials will be available in English and French. None HP, AF, SS, ALAMEA
FRT 3140 French Literary Masterpieces in English Translation 3 AS WLE A survey of the major literary works of France, tracing not only literary but also intellectual and cultural history from the Middle Ages to the present. Junior or senior status, completion of ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or their equivalent. 6AC, LW
FSS 3231 Introduction to Food Production Management 3 HM HRM Food preparation, standards and techniques in commercial food production and service. Factors affecting the quality of food, practical experience in food production and service, in accordance with food standards, sanitation & safety and cost control. None
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 BU GBA This capstone course focuses on helping students develop a top-level executive perspective on managing a business, and requires students to integrate the theoretical and functional area concepts, principles, and skills learned in previous coursework. Senior standing; PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023 SMCC, MW
GEB 4905 Independent Study 1-3 BU GBA Specialized independent study determined by the student’s needs and interests. CI. S/U only
GEO 2371 Introduction to Earth Systems Science 3 AS GPY This course provides a general overview of the earth, the inter-relationship between its functional systems, and a review of human impacts on the earth system at all scales. For non-majors only NS
GEO 3602 Urban Geography 3 AS GPY Spatial analysis of urban areas; growth, location, spacing, and size. Development, site, situation, internal structure, and hinterland are considered. PR: GEO 2400 or CI
GEO 4340 Natural Hazards 3 AS GPY Examination of the physical, social, economic, political and cultural forces that create the phenomena of natural hazards. Case studies from around the world will include floods, droughts, tornadoes, hurricanes, freezes, heat waves, wild fires, earthquakes, tsunami, and volcanoes. Junior or Senior Standing
GEY 2000 Introduction to Gerontology 3 BC GEY This course is designed to be an introduction to the study of aging. The aging process is viewed from a multi-disciplinary perspective including the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging. None SMSS, SS, ALAMEA
GEY 3323 Community Services for Older Adults 3 BC GEY This class is designed to introduce students to services available to older adults and to careers in the field of aging services. Content includes theoretical and practical issues, as well as exposure to opportunities for service and employment. None
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 BC GEY A survey of normal and pathological physical changes occurring from middle age through older age. Course emphasis will be on basic age-related changes and their implications for behavior in older age. None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 BC GEY Consideration of human aging in a broad sociocultural context. Course emphasis will be on historical, philosophical, and demographic aspects of aging, theories of social gerontology, attitudes toward aging and the aged, and cross-cultural perspective. None SS, AF, ALAMEA
GEY 4322 Gerontological Case Management 3 BC GEY This course examines the role and function of case management in meeting the care needs of the older adult. All aspects of case management practice are covered, including the elements of the case management process as well as ethical and legal issues. None
GEY 4360 Gerontological Counseling 3 BC GEY An introduction to the study of the major mental health problems of the elderly. Current approaches to counseling the elderly in community and institutional settings are discussed. None
GEY 4608 Alzheimer’s Disease Management 3 BC GEY This course will provide instruction on effective approaches for providing care to persons with Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders in residential and home care settings. The major dementing disorders and typical behaviors presented by patients are presented along with strategies for successful behavior management. Building a dementia program and building dementia care teams are also covered. PR: GEY 2000 or GEY 3326
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 BC GEY A comprehensive overview of psychological aspects of aging. Topics will include age-related changes in sensation/perception, cognition, and personality, as well as application to late-life psychopathology. None SS
GEY 4641 Death and Dying 3 BC GEY A broad overview of the basic concepts and psychosocial issues relating to the meaning of loss and death, the process of death, and the experience of grieving. Health care practices are considered along with community resources. None SS
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 BC GEY A consideration of the major ethical and legal issues in aging and their implications for policies, priorities, and services. None SS, MW
GEY 4xxx Professional Development and Engagement in Aging 3 AM GEY The intent of the capstone course is threefold: (1) to enhance professional development in
gerontology; (2) pragmatically engage students in the field of practice; and (3) demonstrate mastery of core knowledge/skills gained in the gerontological courses.
PR: GEY 3601, GEY 3625, GEY 4612 SMCC
GEY 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 BC GEY A reading program with topics in gerontology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. CI
GEY 4917 Directed Research 1-4 BC GEY This course will provide Undergraduate Students with an opportunity to engage in an agreed upon research project under the supervision of a professor. The course is open to any major and is repeatable for credit. None
GEY 4935 Special Topics in Gerontology 3 BC GEY Courses on topics such as preretirement, mental health, human services organization, nursing home administration, the older woman, and elder abuse will be offered. None
GEY 4945 Field Placement 1-9 BC GEY Internship in an agency or community setting. A full-time assignment to an agency or organization, engaged in planning or administering programs for older people if in the BA program (6 hours), or to a nursing home if in the BS program (9 hours). CI. Subject to availability of internship sites approved by the School of Aging Studies.
GIS 3006 Computer Cartography 3 AS GPY An introduction to the concepts underlying modern, computer-based mapping and to the collection and storage of digital spatial data. None
GIS 5049 GIS for Non-Majors 3 AS GPY An introduction to the concepts underlying digital thematic mapping and geographical information systems (GIS) for non-geography majors and non-geography graduate students. None
HFT 3003 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism 3 HM HRM An overview of the hospitality industry, including all of its related fields: restaurant; lodging; meetings, conventions and expositions. Also featured are the applications of the general marketing, human resources, leadership, and management. None
HFT 3263 Restaurant Management 3 HM HRM Management of food and beverages as they relate to planning, production, supervision and cost control in restaurants and catering food services, with emphasis on techniques of food preparation, menu merchandising, food safety, bar services and wine list. PR: HFT 3003, FSS 3231; CP: HFT 3424
HFT 3423 Hospitality Information Systems 3 HM HRM The study of management information systems in the hospitality management industry. The students will evaluate software and hardware computer systems and application software being used in the hospitality industry and develop selection strategies. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3424 Cost Control in Hospitality Operations 3 HM HRM Provides students with a thorough understanding of hospitality financial accounting concepts. The emphasis of the course is to use accounting information in making managerial decisions and to prepare and understand hospitality financial statements. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3503 Hospitality Marketing and Sales 3 HM HRM Principles of marketing and sales and practical application in hospitality marketing philosophies; the marketing mix; product differentiation; corporate travel market; and the association, convention, and trade show market. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law & Leadership Ethics 3 HM HRM An analysis of the functions of the law, legal reasoning, and ethical analysis within the hospitality industry. Students examine these issues as they relate to legal reasoning regarding the impact of law on economic enterprise in the hospitality industry. None SMLE
HFT 3700 Tourism Management 3 HM HRM Introductory course to the world of travel and tourism. Topics covered are cultural tourism, eco-tourism, sociology of tourism, tourism components and supply, tourism development, the economic role of tourism demand, and the marketing of tourism. None
HFT 3770 Cruise Line Operations and Management 3 HM HRM Overview of the cruise industry: it’s history and evolution, operating and marketing procedures, career opportunities, ship profiles, itineraries, and ports of call. None
HFT 3861 Beverage Management 3 HM HRM An introduction to the identification, use and service of wines, spirits, and other alcoholic beverages. An in-depth analysis of beverage operations to include selection/storage, inventory, purchasing, sales/promotion/merchandising, profits and bar management. None
HFT 3xxx International Food & Culture 3 HM HRM This course explores cuisines with a focus on the geographic, historic, cultural, religious, and economic influences that shape food availability and consumption.  Students will examine how diversity shapes cultural food patterns. None SMCD
HFT 4221 Human Resources Management 3 HM HRM Designed to educate new managers and supervisors in the complex issues involved in a comprehensive human resource program and its importance to hotel and restaurant business. Workmen’s Compensation, ADA, training, unions, EEO and discrimination issues. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4253 Lodging Management 3 HM HRM Principles, practices, and procedures of managerial functions as they relate to the operation of hotels. Training, conflict resolution, total quality management, crisis management, employee empowerment and service standards are focus of team building. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4277 Club Management 3 HM HRM  This course surveys the operation and management of private city, country and athletic clubs. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4323 Facilities Management in Hospitality Operations 3 HM HRM Engineering aspects of hospitality establishments, preventive maintenance procedures, energy conservation, waste management, pollution control, life safety systems, and facilities design and layout, air conditioning lighting, sound control. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4471 Management Accounting and Finance in the Hospitality Industry 3 HM HRM Financial functions in hospitality, interpret hospitality financial statements, capital investment decision making, financial instruments and concepts. Analytical modeling for hospitality operations, including ratio analysis and capital budgeting tools. PR: FIN 3403, HFT 3003
HFT 4xxx Event Management 3 HM HRM This course will concentrate on established standards, techniques, and practices of event management. The focus will be on social and business functions, and the management of large scale, independent events, such as catering events. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4853 Restaurant Trends and Challenges Seminar 3 HM HRM Advanced level course focusing on contemporary management issues and challenges facing the foodservice and hospitality industries. Topic covered will be applicable to current trends applicable to a variety of situations. Senior standing.
HFT 4930 Special Topics in Hospitality 1-3 HM HRM Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson for pertinent Hospitality Management issues. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4936 Hotel Management Seminar 3 HM HRM Advanced level course focusing on current problems and trends in hotel management and the hospitality industry. Senior standing.
HFT 4945 Hospitality Leadership & Internship 3 HM HRM Coordinated hospitality training combines practical experience with didactic academic analysis. Principles, theory and standard practices applied to operational situations. Senior Standing. Before students take the HFT 4945 Advanced Internship class, they must complete 650 documented working hours in the hospitality industry. SMCC
HIS 3930 Special Topics 2-3 AS HTY This course is designed to emphasize a selected historical problem or issue that is meaningful and challenging to the student. A variety of instructional approaches will be taken to the material. Topics will be changed each semester. None
HIS 3938 Major Issues in History 3 AS HTY This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the historical relationship between (broadly) Asia and the West. It offers non-historians the opportunity to understand the dynamic between past and its interpretation. None MW
HIS 4104 Theory of History 3 AS HTY An analysis of the foundations of historical knowledge and historical methodology. Includes a survey of historical thinking and writing from ancient times to the present. History major status and 2.25 HTY major GPA required.
HIS 4900 Directed Reading 1-4 AS HTY Arrangement with instructor prior to registration. Readings in special topics. CI
HIS 4936 Pro-Seminar in History 4 AS HTY Advanced topics in the various fields of history. Emphasis on discussion of assigned readings and on research and writing of a major paper. History major status and 2.25 HTY major GPA required. SMCC, 6AC, MW
HSC 3301 Health, Safety, Nutrition and Motor Skills for the Young Child 3 ED EDP Provide students with the knowledge to teach developmentally appropriate motor activities; to provide continuous health services; create and maintain a healthy learning environment; and sequence appropriate health instruction for Pre-K through 3rd grade students. None
HSC 3541 Human Structure and Function 3 PH CFH This course is designed to introduce the structural levels of the body beginning with chemicals and progressing through cells, tissues, organs and systems with emphasis on homeostasis, stress and feedback systems. Not restricted to majors. None NS
HUM 4938 Major Issues in the Humanities 3 AS HCS The study of an important topical issue in the Humanities. Materials representing diverse views relating to that issue will be read, and works of art in different media that have relevance to the debate will be studied. Available to majors and non-majors. None MW
IDH 4000 Honors Program Seminar: Major Works/Majors Issues 3 HC HON This course explores major works and major issues in a variety of disciplines. Each section will be devoted to content in a different academic area. PR: IDH 2010
IDH 4910 Undergraduate Research 0-3 HC HON A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. Open to all USF students by application through the undergraduate research coordinator. DPR
IDH 4950 Honors Project 1-4 HC HON A program of independent research or study in areas of specific interest working under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Restricted to Honors College students. None
IDH 4970 Honors Thesis 3 HC HON The development and public presentation of a senior thesis under the direction of a mentor. Course is taken for 2 semesters. Senior Honors Standing
INP 2101 Applied Psychology 3 AS PSY The application of psychological principles and the functions of psychologists in education, government, industry, and clinical practice None
INP 4004 Industrial Psychology 3 AS PSY Applications of psychological principles to industry. Topics include: selection, training, motivation, job satisfaction, supervision, decision-making. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
INR 1015 World Perspective 3 AS PSY An interdisciplinary study of the international system, major world regions and
problems.
None SMSS, SS, AF
INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations 3 AS POL Concepts and analytical tools applied to events such as politics among nations, control of foreign policies, types of actors, war and peace. None
INR 3018 World Ideologies 3 AS INT A course which details and examines the ideologies of today’s independent countries; analyzing them in their political, social, cultural and historical context. None MW
INR 3033 International Political Cultures 3 AS INT This course will explore ways in which culture influences the nature of government, economic success or failure, and constructive and destructive modes of self and social identification. None MW
INR 3038 International Wealth and Power 3 AS INT Introduction to the relationship between politics and economics, emphasizing the analysis of government policies in response to both domestic and international economic problems. None SMLE
INR 3102 American Foreign Policy 3 AS POL Analysis of the development and scope of United States foreign policy, emphasizing goals and objectives, policy formulation and implementation, themes and issues. None
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 AS INT This courses explores the evolution of international rights from the Greeks to the present. It examines human rights issues in major regions of the world. None MW
INR 3336 Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy 3 AS INT An examination of the role of intelligence and the intelligence community in U.S. foreign policy, with emphasis on the period since World War II. None
INR 4035 International Political Economy 3 AS POL Analysis of the development and politics of the international economic system, focusing on questions of cooperation and conflict in trade, aid, and investment relationships. None
INR 4083 Conflict In The World 3 AS INT An interdisciplinary course examining theories of conflict, conflict resolution processes and strategies, theories and peacemaking strategies, and the concept of Early Warning Systems related to the outburst of conflict. Junior/Senior standing MW
INR 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 AS INT A supervised program of intensive reading of interdisciplinary materials in areas of specific interest. CI
INR 4910 Directed Research 1-3 AS INT A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. CI
INR 4931 Selected Topics 1-3 AS INT Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor’s interest. None
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 BU QMB An introduction to the language, concepts, structures and processes involved in the management of information systems including fundamentals of computer-based technology and the use of business-based software for support of managerial decisions. PR: CGS 2100, or CGS 1100, or CGS 1000, or CGS 1061C, or CGS 2060 or equivalent. Minimum grade of C- required for any of the courses.
ISM 3113 Systems Analysis and Design 3 BU QMB The course presents concepts, procedures, and tools needed to build computer-based information systems. The objective is to develop project management, data collection, analysis, design, testing and documentation skills. CP: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 3115 Business Informatics 3 BM QMB Business informatics is concerned with the use of information technology to
solve business problems. The course will present the methods and technical tools
required to design systems to support managerial decision making.
PR: ISM 3011
ISM 3232 Business Application Development 3 BU QMB Presentation of business application development using an object-oriented programming language. Good program design techniques are emphasized. Business applications are developed. CP: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 3431 Operations and Supply Chain Processes 3 BU QMB This course will provide a contemporary overview of operations management with special emphasis on supply chains and services. Both concepts for successful managers and common tools used to build, manage, and improve systems will be covered. PR: QMB 2100, ACG 2071, with grade “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4212 Database Design and Administration 3 BU QMB An introduction to the concepts and principles of database management. Provides potential designers, users and managers of database systems with an understanding of physical vs. logical representations, data modeling, implementation, and data management. PR: ISM 3113 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4220 Business Data Communications 3 BU QMB Fundamentals of data communication, including network architectures, communication protocols, transmission standards, and internetworking. Basic concepts in distributed computing will also be covered. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4233 Information System Interface Design 3 BU QMB An introduction to theories of human-computer interaction and the principles and practices of information system interface design, evaluation, and integration. Students develop programs utilizing various user interface design techniques. PR: ISM 3232 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4234 Object-Oriented Design and Development 3 BU QMB This course presents an object-oriented approach to software development of business information systems. Students will learn to create object models of the business world and to develop information system designs based on these objects. PR: ISM 3232 with a grade of “B” or better
ISM 4300 Managing Information Resources 3 BU QMB Current issues in information systems management focusing on managing computer resources and social issues such as ethics, privacy, and legal issues including intellectual property. PR: ISM 4212 and ISM 4220with grades of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4382 Global Information Systems 3 BU QMB Role of information technology in global business organizations and challenges in building information systems to enable global operations. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4400 Decision Support Systems 3 BU QMB Study of quantitative analysis tools and their use in organizational decision making. Emphasis on a structured approach to making common business decisions, demonstrating several forms of mathematical modeling and other management science techniques. PR: QMB 3200, ISM 3011, with a grade of “C” or better (not C-).
ISM 4480 Electronic Commerce Systems 3 BU QMB Familiarize students with the opportunities and challenges associated with e-commerce and its business models, to explore the underlying technologies used in implementing e-commerce systems, and to develop the skills needed to manage effective Web sites. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-), MIS major or CC
ISM 4930 Selected Topics in MIS 1-3 BU QMB Selected topics in MIS. None
ISM 4950 Independent Research 1-6 BU QMB Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI
ISS 3010 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 AS ISS Integrates the range of social science fields into a global interdisciplinary perspective. Views social institutions and issues from perspectives of changing paradigms. None
ISS 3xxx Applied Statistics for the Social Sciences 3 AM ISS This course builds on a basic knowledge of descriptive and inferential statistics and demonstrates the application of statistics in the social scientific research. Students test hypotheses using statistical software and interpret statistical output. PR: STA 2023
ISS 3300 Research Methods in Social Sciences 3 AM ISS This course introduces students to the methodologies used in social science research. It covers both qualitative and quantitative research design, sampling, measurement, analysis, and critical evaluation of scholarly literature. PR: ISS 3010, ISS 3100
ISS 3930 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 1-3 AS ISS Interdisciplinary studies of varying topics, with course content dependent on student demand and instructor’s interest. None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 AM ISS Interdisciplinary studies of varying topics, with course content dependent on
student demand and instructor’s interest. The course builds on the knowledge
attained from the Research Methods in Social Sciences course.
PR: ISS 3300
ISS 4910 Directed Research 1-3 AS ISS A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. CI
ISS 4935 Seminar in the Social Sciences 3 AS ISS The seminar which caps the interdisciplinary major. Weds personal curiosity with the application of theoretical models to research on salient social issues. Senior standing; PR: ISS 3010 or CI. MW
ISS 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar in ISS 3 AM ISS This course facilitates the completion of an interdisciplinary capstone project that showcases the skills students have acquired throughout their course of study in the major. A selected topic is used to illustrate the interdisciplinary research process. PR: ISS 3931 SMCC
ISS 4940 Internship in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences 1-4 AP ISS Individual guidance in a selected internship. Restricted to majors. Nonrepeatable. ISS Majors only
LAE 4314 Teaching Writing in the Elementary School, Grades K-6 3 ED EDE The purpose of this course is for students to understand children’s writing development and to design and implement instructional strategies for teaching composition in an integrated Language Arts curriculum. Elementary Education majors or CL
LAE 4414 Teaching Literature in the Elementary School, Grades K-6 3 ED EDE This course involves the selection, evaluation, and use of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for instructional, informational, and recreational purposes in childhood education. None 6A, LW
LDR 3003 Introduction to Leadership Studies 3 AM LDR This course focus is understanding self and personal leadership. It covers a
broad range of leadership topics from understanding self, group behavior,
teamwork, organizational design, ethics, and change
None
LDR 3263 Community Leadership Practicum 3 US LDR This course involves the transference of leadership theories into practice. It provides a practical forum for students to examine and develop personal leadership skills. PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 4104 with a minimum grade of C-. SMCC
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 US LDR Explores the complex challenges of leadership through the examination of leaders and workforce situations. Designed to view leadership as a process focusing on the leader, the followers, and real-world workplace situations. Appropriate for working adults. Junior Standing
LDR 3930 Selected Topics in Student Leadership 0-4 US LDR Course content will depend upon the interest of the faculty member and student demand. Repeatable up to 15 credits. None
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 US LDR Focuses on historical and modern views of leadership. It is designed to assist students analyzing and understanding the historical, social, political aspects of leadership theories and styles as well as the application of leadership theories in settings. PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C-,
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 US LDR Survey of historical and contemporary writings on leadership skills and practices. Examines the contextual manner in which the leader functions. None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 US LDR Course reviews arguments for ethics in leadership as proposed by both contemporary and ancient leadership theories. It also examines theories of power and authority, and seeks answers to the apparent dilemmas through applied moral theory and psychology. None SMLE
LIN 3801 Language and Meaning 3 AS WLE A survey introduction for non-specialists to the basic principles of semantics and the way language conveys ideas. This course is also available on WUSF/TV Channel 16 by the O.U. Program. None 6AC
LIN 4671 Traditional English Grammar 3 AS ENG A course primarily using the sentence diagram to present a detailed analysis of the parts of speech, verb tenses, sentence functions, and other basic grammatical classifications of traditional English grammar. None
LIN 4680 Structure of American English 3 AS ENG An introductory survey of traditional, structural, and generative transformational grammars and their techniques for the analysis and description of linguistic structure in general, and contemporary American English, in particular. None
LIS 5020 Foundations of Library and Information Science 3 AS LIS Introduction to the study of library and information science, history; organization; specialized literature; outstanding leaders; current trends, issues, and problems; the place of the information agency in society with its contributions to that society. None
LIS 5937 Selected Topics in Library Studies 1-4 AS LIS Covers a variety of topics in such areas as collection development, reference services, technical services, and administration. None
LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature 3 AS ENG This course will introduce students to the three major literary forms of prose, poetry and drama as well as to various “schools” of literary criticism. Will not count toward the English major. None 6AC, SMHU
LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction 3 AS ENG A study of the short story and novel as literary forms; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any historical period. Will not count toward the English major. None 6AC, HP
LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry 3 AS ENG A study of the poem as literary form; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any historical period. Will not count toward the English major. None SMHU, 6AC, HP
LIT 2040 Introduction to Drama 3 AS ENG This course will introduce students to the literary form of drama as well as to the various “schools” of literary criticism. Will not count toward the English major. None 6AC, HP
LIT 3022 Modern Short Prose 3 AS ENG This course for English majors and minors explores modern short prose in World, British, and American literatures; genres include the short story, the long short story, the short novel, and the essay. Not repeatable. ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.
LIT 3031 Survey of Poetry 3 AS ENG A chronological sampling of the major poems written in English from the Middle Ages to the present. Recommended as the first literature course in the CRW (Poetry emphasis) Option. None
LIT 3043 Modern Drama 3 AS ENG A study of such modern and contemporary dramatists as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Shaw, O’Neill, Pinter, Stoppard, Brecht, Beckett, and Ionesco. None
LIT 3093 Contemporary Literature 3 AS ENG An introduction to the fiction, poetry, and drama written since 1945–American, British, Continental, or Multicultural. Focus may be on one, two, or all three genres or on works from any combination of nationalities. None
LIT 3101 Literature of the Western World Through the Renaissance 3 AS ENG A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from its beginnings through the Renaissance, including the Bible, Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Euripides, Virgil, Cicero, Dante, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Rabelais, among others. None
LIT 3102 Literature of the Western World Since the Renaissance 3 AS ENG A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from the Neoclassic to the Modern Period, including such writers as Moliere, Racine, Voltaire, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Ibsen, Kafka, Gide, Sartre, and Camus, among others. None
LIT 3103 Great Literature of the World 3 AS ENG A survey of world literature including samples from the ancient and modern era, Western and Eastern traditions, male and female writers, and various ethnic cultures. Focus on values/ethics, race, ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. Will not count toward the English major. None 6AC, MW, LW
LIT 3144 Modern European Novel 3 AS ENG A study of the Modern European novel in translation as it developed from the nineteenth century to the present, including such writers as Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Kafka, Hesse, Camus, and Solzhenitsyn. None 6AC, HP
LIT 3301 Cultural Studies and the Popular Arts 3 AS ENG A study of American and international cultures as they are represented in the film, fiction, and other cultural artifacts of various ethnic groups and nationalities. Focuses on values/ethics, race, ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. Will not count toward the English major. None 6AC, MW, LW
LIT 3374 The Bible As Literature 3 AS ENG Major emphasis on literary types, literary personalities of the Old (Fall semester) and New (Spring semester) Testaments, and Biblical archetypes of British and American literary classics. Focuses on values/ethics, race, ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. May be taken twice for credit with different subject matter. May count once toward the major. None 6AC, MW
LIT 3383 The Image of Women in Literature 3 AS ENG This course seeks to trace the origins of contemporary views about women, to analyze major Eastern and Western literary portrayals of women, to examine ideas about women’s roles, and to compare and contrast cultural and racial images of women. Will not count toward the English major. None 6AC, MW, LW
LIT 3410 Religious and Philosophical Themes 3 AS ENG Theological and philosophical ideas, allusions, and symbols in the writings of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Mann, Joyce, Eliot, Camus, Sartre, among others. None
LIT 3451 Literature and the Occult 3 AS ENG An introduction to the occult tradition as a major ingredient in English, Continental, American, and Multicultural literature. Focuses on values/ethics, race/ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. Will not count toward the English major. None 6A, MW, LW
LIT 3930 Special Topics in English Studies 3 AS ENG The study of variable specialized areas of literary interest, suitable for
junior and senior English majors. Topics will vary according to student interest
and instructor expertise. May be taken twice for credit with different topics.
None
LIT 4386 British and American Literature by Women 3 AS ENG Survey of women’s literary tradition in England and America from the seventeenth century to the present. Thematic focus includes self, marriage, sexuality, madness, race and generations. Writing intensive. None 6AC
LIT 4930 Selected Topics in English Studies 1-3 AS ENG The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. Special courses in writing may also be offered under this title. May be taken twice for credit with different topics None
MAC 1105 College Algebra 3 AS MTH Concepts of the real number system, functions, graphs, and complex numbers. Analytic skills for solving linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic equations. Mathematical modeling of real life applications. College Algebra may be taken either for General Education credit or as preparation for a pre-calculus course. C (2.0) or better in MAT 1033, or 490 or better SAT Math score, or 21 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better Elementary Algebra CPT score, or 40 or better College-Level Math CPT score. No credit for students with prior credit for MAC 1140 or MAC 1147. SMMA, 6AM, QM
MAC 1140 Precalculus Algebra 3 AS MTH Review of functions and graphs. Analytic geometry including conic sections and rotation of axes, systems of equations including matrix algebra and determinants, sequences and series including Binomial Theorem. C (2.0) or better in MAC 1105, or 550 or better SAT Math Score, or 24 or better ACT Math Score. CP: MAC 1114 6AM
MAC 1147 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry 4 AS MTH This is an accelerated combination of MAC 1140 and MAC 1114; this course is best for students who have already seen some trigonometry. See the descriptions of MAC 1140 and MAC 1114. C (2.0) or better in MAC 1105, or 550 or better SAT Math score, or 24 or better ACT Math score, or 60 or better College-Level Math CPT score. No credit for students with credit for either MAC 1140 or MAC 1114. SMMA, 6AM, QM
MAC 2233 Business Calculus 3 AS MTH Linear equations and functions, mathematics of finance, differentiation and integration of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business, finance and economics. C (2.0) or better in MAC 1105, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1140, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or 590 or better SAT Math score, or 26 or better ACT Math score, or 78 or better College-Level Math CPT score. No credit for mathematics majors. SMMA, 6AM, QM
MAC 2241 Life Sciences Calculus I 3 AS MTH No credit for math majors. Differentiation and integration of algebraic,
trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions with applications to life
sciences.
C (2.0) or better in MAC 1114, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or 650 or better SAT Math score, or 29 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better College-Level Math CPT score, and knowledge of trigonometry SMMA
MAC 2311 Calculus I 3 AS MTH Differentiation, limits, differentials, extremes, indefinite integral. PR: C (2.0) or better in MAC 1114 and C (2.0) or better in MAC 1140, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or 650 or better SAT Math score, or 29 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better College-Level Math CPT score, and knowledge of trigonometry. 6AM, QM, CAMA
MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics 3 HM EIT This course covers set theory, logic, proofs, counting techniques, and graph
theory.
None
MAE 4310 Teaching Elementary School (K – 6) Mathematics I 3 ED EDE Methods for teaching number ideas, computation skills, and mathematical reasoning in elementary (K – 6) classrooms. Admission to College of Education and two college level mathematics courses
MAE 4326 Teaching Elementary School (K – 6) Mathematics II 3 ED EDE Methods for teaching informal geometry, measurement, probability , statistics, and algebraic thinking for elementary school (K – 6) classrooms. PR: MAE 4310
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 BU MAN Examines intrapersonal, interpersonal, group/team, organizational, and environmental (both stakeholder and societal) factors influencing the management task. None
MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis 3 BU MAN The course covers research literature relevant to organizational functioning including behavioral effects of power and authority, formal organization, structural variation, leadership, motivation, and communication. PR: MAN 3025
MAN 3301 Human Resource Management 3 BU MAN To develop a broad exposure to new approaches, techniques, and future trends in the management of personnel. A study of the major functions in personnel including job analysis, manpower planning, selection, performance evaluation, training, and wage and salary administration. None
MAN 4282 Organizational Assessment 3 BU MAN The analysis and measurement of factors which influence organizational effectiveness and the quality of work life. Data based cases will be used by students to assess managerial and supervisory skills and to measure organizational functioning and work design. PR: MAN 3240
MAN 4402 Employment Laws 3 BU MAN Federal and state regulation of the employment relationship, including wage and hour laws; EEO; affirmative action programs; employee benefits; insurance; workers’ compensation, safety, health, employee’s personal rights; collective bargaining legislation. None
MAN 4430 Seminar in Negotiations and Administration of Labor Agreements 3 BU MAN Case studies in contract negotiation, administration, grievance settlement, and arbitration. Assumes familiarity with industrial relations system. None
MAN 4504 Operations Management: A Systems Approach 3 BU QMB Studies the problems of “operations” in all types of enterprises in both the public and private sectors. Emphasis is placed on the application of various decision science methodologies to problem situations. PR: ISM 3431 or equivalent
MAN 4600 International Management 3 BU MAN Examines the effects of international cultural differences on business practices within and outside the United States and provides methods to build synergies and establish/enhance competitive advantage via those differences. PR: MAN 3025, Senior Standing or CI
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 BU MAN Study of the factors involved in starting and managing a small- to medium-sized business. Emphasis on conduct of pre-business feasibility study, start-up of business, successful management of the firm, and options for succession or termination. PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023, or CI
MAN 4804 Small Business Management Counseling 3 BU MAN Field application in small business settings by (a) analyzing an on-going small business and developing recommendations for making improvements; or (b) conducting a feasibility study for a new enterprise and developing a strategy for implementation if favorable. PR: MAN 4802 or CI
MAN 4905 Independent Study 1-3 BU MAN Specialized independent study determined by the students needs and interests. CI. S/U only
MAN 4930 Selected Topics in Management 1-3 BU MAN Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson for pertinent Management issues. None
MAN 4931 Independent Research 1-4 BU MAN Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 BU MKT Survey of the marketing of goods and services within the economy. Attention is paid to the impact of marketing on other functional areas of business as well as society. Junior standing
MAR 3400 Professional Selling 3 BU MKT A study of the stages of the professional selling process, and the role of sales in today’s marketing environment. Emphasis on learning adaptive selling techniques and developing effective interpersonal communications skills. Sales careers are examined. PR: MAR 3023 or CI
MAR 3613 Marketing Research 3 BU MKT A study of research methods and techniques applicable to problem solving in marketing. Attention is also given to defining information needs, determining the value of information, interpreting and reporting information for use in marketing decision making. PR: QMB 2100, MAR 3023
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 BU MKT An applications oriented study of the marketing function at an intermediate level. Emphasis upon techniques for analysis and problem-solving. Builds upon the principles and concepts learned in MAR 3023, and provides a strong foundation for the remaining courses in the marketing curriculum. PR: MAR 3023
MAR 4156 International Marketing 3 BU MKT A study of procedures and problems associated with establishing marketing operations in foreign countries. Includes the institutions, principles and methods involved in the solution of these business problems as well as the effects of national differences on business practices and buyer behavior. PR: MAR 3023
MAR 4333 Promotion Management 3 BU MKT A study of the role of promotion in the marketing program of the firm, including the promotional tools available to the marketing manager and the various types of decisions made in the promotional area. Decision making process in development of a promotional program is emphasized. PR: MAR 3023 or CI
MAR 4503 Buyer Behavior 3 BU MKT A study of the basic concepts of buyer behavior, including pre- and post-purchase attitudes and behavior patterns, information processing relating to the functional areas of marketing and the buyer’s decision-making process. Managerial applications to marketing are emphasized. PR: MAR 3023
MAR 4824 Marketing Management Problems 3 BU MKT The integration of marketing knowledge applied to decision roles in managing the total marketing effort of firms, and coordination with other major functional areas on specific problems. Senior Standing; PR: MAR 3823, MAR 3613, MAR 4333
MAR 4903 Independent Research 1-3 BU MKT Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI
MAR 4905 Independent Study 1-3 BU MKT Specialized independent study determined by the students’ needs and interests. CI. S/U only
MAR 4933 Selected Topics In Marketing 1-3 BU MKT Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson. None
MCB 3020C General Microbiology 4 AS BCM Structure and function of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes. Laboratory includes media preparation and culturing, staining and enumeration techniques. Lecture and Laboratory. PCB 3063 is recommended. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, and CHM 2210 and MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
MCB 4202 Ecology of Infectious Diseases 3 AS BIN The ecology of pathogenic microorganisms. Topics include host-parasite interactions, microbial survival strategies, microbial virulence, and environmental influences on the maintenance and spread of disease. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, and MCB 3020C or PCB 3043
MGF 1106 Finite Mathematics 3 AS MTH Concepts and analytical skills in areas of logic, linear equations, linear programming, mathematics of finance, permutations and combinations, probability, and descriptive statistics. C (2.0) or better in MAT 1033, or 440 or better SAT Math score, or 19 or better ACT Math Score, or 72 or better Elementary Algebra CPT score SMMA, 6AM, QM
MHS 5020 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling 3 BC REH A skill-building course on the utilization of one’s self in mental health counseling relationships. Includes study of the origin, history, professional functions and current issues in the discipline of mental health counseling. CC
MHS 5480 Human Growth and Development 3 BC REH Human development theory as applied in psychotherapy and case management rehabilitation, mental health, and addiction settings. PR: RCS 5780, MHS 5020, Majors only
MUH 2051 Folk And Traditional Music Of World Cultures 3 TA MUS A comparative survey of the stylistic traits and functions of folk and traditional music, both sacred and secular, of diverse Western and non-Western cultures. For non-majors and music education majors; may be taken by applied music majors. None FA, AF, ALAMEA
MUL 2xxx Music and Culture 3 MUS

This course surveys the evolution of music within the context of historical events and modern society.  Students will develop the skills necessary to appreciate and critically evaluate music from around the world.

None SMHU, 6AC
MUL 2111 Introduction To Music Literature 3 TA MUS A survey of representative music exemplars of the past and present with emphasis on the study of styles and form. Required for music majors. PR: MUT 1112 or DPR 6AC, HP, FA
MUL 3001 Issues In Music 2-3 TA MUS Lectures and live performances by artist faculty of significant works from the literature for the piano; analysis and illustration in performance of the abstract and aesthetic elements in music which vitally concern the artist-performer. Open only to non-music majors FA, AF, ALAMEA
MUL 3011 Music in Your Life 3 TA MUS A study in the art of music and its materials, designed to develop an understanding of basic principles of music and a technique for listening to music. Open only to non-music majors FA
NUR 3066 Physical Examination and Assessment 2 NU NUR Focus is on the use of techniques and instruments necessary for the examination of infants, children and adults. Emphasizes assessment phase of critical thinking to enable student to perform evaluations of health status throughout the lifespan. PR: NUR 3026 and NUR 3026L
NUR 3066L Clinical Experience in Health Assessment – RN 1 NU NUR Clinical experience on history taking, physical assessment skills basic to biopsychosocial assessment and physical examination of adults and children. Emphasizes diagnostic reasoning and identification of alteration in functional health patterns. Admission to nursing major of CI. CR: NUR 3066
NUR 3125 Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice 4 NU NUR Central concepts of pathophysiology: cells, tissues, organs and systems. Provides essential knowledge base in pathophysiology across the lifespan for professional nursing practice. Admission to the nursing major or CI
NUR 3145 Pharmacology in Nursing Practice 3 NU NUR Focus on the basic and clinical concepts of pharmacology in nursing practice. Examines pharmacotherapeutics; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; adverse reactions and contraindications; therapeutic indications and nursing implications. Admission to the nursing major or CI
NUR 3805 Education Transitions for Registered Nurses 3 NU NUR Transition to professional nursing for the registered nurse, its theoretical perspective and empirical bases and essential skills for success in nursing education. Focus on developing a variety of learning strategies and approaches to academic achievement. Admission to the nursing major
NUR 3826 Ethical Legal Aspects in Nursing and Health Care 3 NU NUR Introduction to contemporary bioethical and legal issues confronting health care providers in a variety of settings. Focuses on identification of legal and ethical principles underlying the decision-making process in nursing and health care. CI. Nursing Majors MW
NUR 3843 Problem Solving and Critical Thinking in Professional Nursing I 1 NU NUR The course is introduces the theoretical component of problem solving & critical thinking in professional nursing. The focus is developing critical thinking skills specific to problem solving in professional nursing. Admission to the nursing major
NUR 3844 Problem Solving and Critical Thinking in Professional Nursing II 1 NU NUR This course provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate achievement in problem solving and critical thinking in the nursing curriculum. The focus is applying critical thinking skills specific to problem solving in professional nursing. PR: NUR 3843
NUR 4165 Nursing Inquiry 3 NU NUR An analysis of the research process. Emphasis on identification of researchable nursing problems and evaluations of research that is applicable to nursing practice. Focus on evidence-based practice for nursing. Admission to the nursing major or CI. An introductory course in statistics is recommended 6AC
NUR 4636 Community/Public Health: Population-Focused Nursing 3 NU NUR In-depth examination of community health nursing, public health, epidemiology, culture, and environment essential to preventing illness and injury and promoting and preserving health among diverse populations at risk. PR: NUR 3215, NUR 3525 or NUR 3535, NUR 4216 and NUR 3215L, NUR 4216L and NUR 3525 or NUR 3535L or NUR 5580L. CR: NUR 4636L MW
NUR 4636L Community/Public Health Nursing Clinical 3 NU NUR The course provides clinical learning experiences in community-based sites in both urban and rural settings. Focuses on nursing care designed to prevent and/or reduce risk of disease and injury, promote health and wellness, and to diverse populations across the age spectrum. PR: NUR 3215, NUR 3525 or NUR 3535, NUR 4216 and NUR 3215L, NUR 4216L and NUR 3525 or NUR 3535L; CR: NUR 4636; CP: NUR 4636 or NUR 4286
NUR 4645 Substance Abuse Across the Lifespan 3 NU NUR Introduction to concepts of substance abuse and theories of addiction. The applicability of theories and concepts of substance use/abuse to clinical assessment, diagnosis and intervention with client populations across the lifespan is explored. None
NUR 4655 Cultural Diversity in Health and Issues 3 NU NUR Explore the impact of culture on health, illness and the meanings these terms carry for members of differing sociocultural populations. Health-related practices, values, strategies for health care and beliefs among cultural groups will be analyzed. None MW
NUR 4807C Leadership & Education Transitions for RNs 3 NU NUR Professional practice and principles of leadership and management for licensed RNs. Focuses on decision making and managing nursing care using multiple learning strategies for academic success. Clinical experiences build upon a practice background. Admission to the RN-MS Sequence (NAS/NBM)
NUR 4827C Leadership and Management in Professional Nursing Practice 3 NU NUR Principles of nursing leadership and management with an emphasis on decision-making, priority-setting, delegating, and managing nursing care. Focus on the preparation of the professional nurse to work collaboratively in the interdisciplinary healthcare environment. There will be in depth examination of process improvement with a focus on the quality indicator process. Clinical experiences for registered nurse students will be designed to build upon a practice background. PR: NUR 4216, NUR 4216L, NUR 4636, NUR 4636L, or CI
OCE 2001 Introduction to Oceanography 3 MS MSC This is a class in basic oceanography covering chemical (what is the sea made of), physical (tides, currents, waves), geological (ocean floor and coasts) and biological (all life in the oceans) aspects, and their interactions.  None SMNS,NS, CANP
PAD 3003 Introduction to Public Administration 3 AS PAD Examination of organizational behavior and change, policy process, public management, financial administration, and personnel management from the perspective of public and social delivery. None SS
PAD 4415 Personnel & Supervision in Today’s Organizations 3 AS PAD Introduces students to concepts, principles and practices of personnel management and supervision that influence the attainment of desired performance goals in today’s public and not-for profit organizations. Course participants will explore issues that influence the successful management of human resources in dynamic employment settings. None
PAD 5807 Urban and Local Government Administration 3 AS PAD Analysis of the role of the administrator at the municipal level, the division of functions, policy formation, alternative governmental structures, effects on the administrative process. GS or Sr
PAD 5836 Comparative Public Administration 3 AS PAD How organizations and managers perform within a particular environment, potential impact of innovation, and how service is accomplished in a variety of socio-economic environments. GS or Sr
PCB 3023 Cell Biology 3 AS BIO Cell Biology is the study of living properties of cells and encompasses a broad area of the life sciences that includes cellular physiology and life cycle, organelle structure and function, and biomolecular structure and function. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L and CHM 2045, CHM 2046 and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023), CP: CHM 2210
PCB 3023L Cell Biology Laboratory 1 AS BIO Laboratory portion of Cell Biology. Metabolic processes within the cell. PR: PCB 3023
PCB 3043 Principles of Ecology 3 AS BIO An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of ecology at the ecosystem, community, and population level of organization. Lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023)
PCB 3043L Principles of Ecology Laboratory 1 AS BIO Laboratory portion of PCB 3043, Principles of Ecology. PR: PCB 3043
PCB 3063 General Genetics 3 AS BIO Introduction to genetics including the fundamental concepts of Mendelian, molecular and population genetics. Lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023); CP: CHM 2210
PCB 3063L  General Genetics Laboratory  AS  BIO  Laboratory investigation techniques in general genetics including Mendelian and non-Mendelian relationships, and gene interactions. PR: PCB 3063
PCB 3712 General Physiology AS BIO Comparative analysis of animal structure and function: organ systems and activities of body tissue and organs. Functional responses of plants to both internal and environmental signals lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023)
PCB 3713L General Physiology Laboratory 1 AS BIO Laboratory portion of General Physiology. PR: PCB 3712
PCB 4024 Molecular Biology of the Cell 3 AS BIO This lecture-based course will focus on advanced principles of molecular cell biology with emphasis on protein structure and function in key cellular pathways. The course is suitable for majors/nonmajors. PR: PCB 3023, PCB 3063
PCB 4026 Molecular Biology of the Gene 3 AS BIO This lecture-based course will provide fundamental knowledge of scientific concepts and principles of the molecular aspects of DNA metabolism in pro- and eukaryotes for majors/nonmajors. PR: PCB 3023, PCB 3063
PCB 4234 Principles of Immunology 3 AS BIO Emphasis is on organization and functions of vertebrate immune system. Basic cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune responses in health and disease are addressed as well as the principles and applications of immunological methods. Lecture only. PR: (PCB 3023 or PCB 3063 or MCB 3020C) and CHM 2210 and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023); CP: (PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712) and CHM 2211
PCB 4679 Biology Capstone Course:  Evolution 3 AM BIO Principles of evolutionary theory are examined in the context of biological systems at all organizational levels. Required capstone course for Biology majors. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, and BSC 2011L; Biology majors must have senior rank. SMCC
PHI 3636 Professional Ethics 3 AS PHI An examination of the ethical problems that professionals will face in the complex, global society of the next few decades: confidentiality, divided loyalty, racism/sexism, etc. None
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 AS PHI A study of alternative theories of environmental ethics, including the application of these theories to contemporary environmental problems, such as pollution, resource depletion, species extinction, and land use. None SS
PHY 2053 General Physics I 3 AS PHY First semester of a two semester sequence of non-calculus-based general physics (mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, modern physics) for science students. PR: (MAC 1140 and MAC 1114) or MAC 1147. Must be taken concurrently with lab and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. May not receive credit for both the PHY 2053 and PHY 2048 courses SMNS, NS
PHY 2053L General Physics I Laboratory 1 AS PHY First semester of a two semester sequence of general physics (mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, modern physics) laboratory for science students. PR:  PHY 2053, PHY 2053L. Must be taken concurrently with lecture and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. May not receive credit for both the PHY 2054L and PHY 2049L courses.
PHY 2054 General Physics II 3 AS PHY Second semester of non-calculus based general physics. Topics studied include
electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics
PR: PHY 2053, PHY 2053L. Must be taken concurrently with lab and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously. May not
receive credit for both the PHY 2054 and PHY 2049 courses
SMNS, NS, CANP
PHY 2054L General Physics II Laboratory 1 AS PHY Second semester of general physics lab for science students. PR: PHY 2053, PHY 2053L
POS 2041 American National Government 3 AS POL Analysis of basic principles and procedures of the American governmental system with emphasis on current issues and trends. None SMSS
POS 2080 The American Political Tradition 3 AS POL This course is an introductory survey of the historical developments and changes
in American political institutions, processes, and thought
None SMSS, SS, HP
POS 3182 Florida Politics and Government 3 AS POL A study of Florida political culture, political parties and elections, the legislative, executive, and judicial systems, and policy patterns. None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 AS POL Examines some of the major issues involving environmental law. Specially, the course provides a survey and analysis of statutes, both state and federal, regulating water, air, soil pollution, and resource conservation and recovery. It will also address questions pertaining to problems of implementation, interpretation, enforcement, and development of environmental laws. None
POS 3713 Empirical Political Analysis 3 AS POL Fundamentals of empirical political inquiry: systematic data collection and quantitative analysis techniques. Laboratory exercises using the computer are required. None
POS 3931 Selected Topics 3 AS POL Selected topics in political science with course content based upon student demand and instructor’s interest. None
POS 4614 Constitutional Law I 3 AS POL Leading social problems, principle institutions, and the scope of powers. Analysis of Supreme Court decisions, scholarly commentaries, and the writings of leading public figures. PR: POS 2041
POS 4624 Constitutional Law II 3 AS POL Analysis of Supreme Court decisions and scholarly commentaries on the constitutional rights of individuals. PR: POS 2041
POS 4694 Women and Law II 3 AS WST Legal position of women in American society and remedies available to challenge current laws and practices, with specific emphasis on employment and education issues as they relate to both women and men. PR: POS 4693 or CI 6AC, MW
POS 4905 Independent Study 1-3 AS POL Specialized study determined by the student’s needs and interests. 3.0 average in Political Science and CI. S/U only
POS 4910 Individual Research 1-3 AS POL Investigation of some aspect of political science culminating in the preparation of an original research paper. 3.0 average in Political Science and CI
POT 3003 Introduction to Political Theory 3 AS POL Examines various kinds of theory used in political science for understanding political life: normative theory, empirical theory, historicism theory, analytical theory, and critical theory. None
PPE 4003 Personality 3 AS PSY Methods and findings of personality theories and an evaluation of constitutional, biosocial, and psychological determinants of personality. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
PSB 3444 Drugs and Behavior 3 AS PSY This is a basic introduction to drugs and their effects on society and behavior. Specifically, drug regulations and laws will be covered as well as how drugs interact with the brain to alter consciousness. None
PSB 3842 Sleep and Dreams 3 AM PSY An overview of the psychological and physiological foundations of sleep and dreams. Disorders and disturbances of sleep and cultural perspectives on sleep and dreams. None
PSB 4004C Physiological Psychology 3 AS PSY Gross neural and physiological components of behavior. Structure and function of the central nervous system and theory of brain functions. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI
PSY 2012 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 AS PSY This course is an introduction to psychology for majors and nonmajors. It presents psychological theory and methods in a survey of various areas of psychology including clinical, cognitive, developmental, health, industrial, social and biopsychology. None SMSS, SS
PSY 3xxx Introduction to Psychological Statistics 3 AM PSY This course covers basic descriptive statistics and inferential analysis procedures in psychological
research. Students will learn to use statistical analysis programs.
PR: STA 2023
PSY 3204 Psychological Statistics 3 AS PSY Introduction to analyzing psychological data, in the context of behavioral research. Covers basic research design, descriptive statistics, analysis procedures, use of computer analysis packages, interpretation of outputs, and implications for research. PR: PSY 2012 6AM, QM
PSY 3213 Research Methods in Psychology 4 AS PSY This course considers the logic of experimental design, concept of control and the analysis of experimentally obtained data. The laboratory section provides experience applying the concepts discussed in lecture. Two lectures plus two-hour lab. PR: PSY 2012 with a grade of C or better or CI
PSY 4205 Experimental Design and Analysis 3 AS PSY Detailed coverage of those research designs and statistical techniques having the greatest utility for research problems in psychology. Emphasis on topics from analysis of variance. PR: PSY 3213 with grade of C or better or CI.
PSY 4913 Directed Study 1-3 AS PSY The student plans and conducts an individual research project or program of directed readings under the supervision of a faculty member. S/U only. PR: PSY 3213. S/U only. A maximum of 3 credits of either PSY 4913 or PSY 4970 may count toward the major
PSY 4931 Selected Topics: Seminar 3 AS PSY Graduate-type seminar designed to provide the advanced undergraduate student with an in-depth understanding of a selected sub-area within psychology. PR: PSY 3213 with grade of C or better. Upper-level standing, psychology major and CI
PSY 4938 Pro Seminar 3 AS PSY This course is intended to provide advanced undergraduates with a “capstone” experience in psychology and provides the opportunity to synthesize and apply learning from other courses as they explore a specific topic, which will vary. PR: PSY 3213. Senior standing. Area I and Area II requirements complete. Students should take this course close to the end of the psychology program. SMCC
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 AS POL Examines the politics of environmental issues, formation and implementation of environmental policy. None
QMB 2100 Business and Economic Statistics I 3 BU QMB Data description; exploratory data analysis; introduction to probability; binomial and normal distributions; sampling distributions; estimation with confidence intervals; tests of hypotheses; control charts for quality improvement. None 6AM, QM
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 BU QMB Simple linear regression and correlation; multiple regression and model building; forecasting models; analysis of variance; chi-square tests; nonparametric methods. PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100
QMB 4250 Business Analytics 3 BM QMB This course covers the concepts and methods in the field of business analytics.
It involves the analysis of large quantities of data found in businesses, for
supporting business decisions. Data Mining and multivariate statisical
techniques are covered.
PR: QMB 3200
QMB 4690 Lean Operations and Six Sigma 3 BM QMB Focuses on concepts and principles of Lean Six Sigma, methods/tools/techniques
utilized to optimize operational efficiencies, designing and improving
product/process/service quality as applicable for manufacturing, service, and
healthcare organizations.
PR: QMB 2100, QMB 3200, ISM 3431
QMB 4700 Business Decision Modeling 3 BM QMB Formulate and solve optimization and simulation models to assist in business
decision-making on a variety of manufacturing, healthcare, and service systems
problems such as: scheduling, routing, logistics, financials, and manpower
planning.
PR: QMB 2100, ISM 3431
RCS 4931 Selected Topics in Counseling Professions 3 BC REH Provides an overview of counseling professions including current issues, standards of practice, and future trends. Will cover legal and ethical and professional issues. None
RCS 5035 Rehabilitation Counseling: Concepts and Applications 3 BC REH Introduction to the profession of Rehabilitation Counseling and current issues in the field. Coverage includes rehabilitation history, legislation, case management and related services for Americans with disabilities. CC
RCS 5080 Medical Aspects of Disability 3 BC REH A survey of medical conditions and disabilities encountered by rehabilitation and mental health counselors. Examines the relationship of client handicaps, physical and mental, to rehabilitation and mental health programming. PR: RCS 5780 or CP
RCS 5450 Fundamentals of Substance Abuse Counseling 3 BC REH An overview of alcohol and other drug abuse. Explores the extent and rate of abuse in the United States, causes, biology, psychosocial aspects, legal aspects, and treatment. None
RCS 5780 Legal, Ethical, Professional Standards and Issues in Counseling 3 BC REH An overview of all aspects of professional functioning including history, roles, organizational structures, ethics, standards and credentialing. Contemporary and developing issues in the field of professional counseling will also be addressed. CC
RED 4310 Reading and Learning to Read 3 ED EDE This course will prepare pre-service teachers to understand the foundations of reading and the inherent learning principles to produce successful readers. The course focuses on appropriate instructional strategies to enhance reading development and reading across the curriculum. Admission to College of Education
RED 4511 Linking Literacy Assessment to Instruction 3 ED EDR This course will prepare pre-service teachers to use multiple assessment measures to assess and diagnose students’ strengths and needs in literacy learning. Based on individual student profiles, teachers will design instruction to enhance literacy development. PR: RED 4310
REE 3043 Real Estate Decision Making 3 BU FIN Acquaints students with the range of knowledge required to engage in real estate decision-making in the United States. Integrates the institutional framework with which decisions are made, the elements of financial analysis, deal structuring and marketing, and the pricing, financing, and allocation of real property in the real estate markets. PR: FIN 3403
REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions 3 AS REL Introduction to World Religions is designed to give students a broad and general overview of the major religious traditions of the world. Students will be exposed to the history, primary beliefs, and information necessary for a primary understanding of each of the religions studied in the course. None SMSS, HP, SS
REL 3040 Introduction to Religious Studies 3 AS REL This course introduces students to the academic study of religion. Religious
thought and behavior are examined from a variety of methodological perspectives. Restricted to majors and minors. Required for the major and the minor in Religious Studies.
None
REL 3043 Introduction to Major Religious Texts 3 AS REL The course provides an introduction to the study of some of the foundational texts of selected religious traditions by focusing on reading and interpretative strategies in order to understand the central beliefs and practices presented in these texts. None
REL 3114 Comedy, Tragedy, and Religion 3 AS REL Examines the visions of life in comedy and tragedy, and relates both to Judaism, Christianity, and Zen Buddhism. None 6AC, MW
REL 3308 World Religions 3 AS REL World Religions gives students an overview of the major religions of the world from their origins through the modern period. Special attention is given to the analysis of myths, rituals, history, and other features of the religions. None 6AC, HP
REL 3363 Introduction to Islam 3 AS REL This course introduces the basic elements of Islamic belief and practice, placing the rise of Islam in its historical context in the Middle East, and stressing issues of diversity (including ethnicity and gender). None HP, AF, ALAMEA
REL 3613 Modern Judaism 3 AS REL A study of modern Jewish life and thought in the West, including the study of beliefs, practices, institutions, major thinkers, and intellectual trends. None 6AC, MW, LW
REL 3801 History of Writing 2 AS REL Study, in reasonable detail, of the history and evolution of writing within its societal context. We will stress the development of writing in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Mediterranean World, looking at the transition from oral to written literature and its impact on religion. None
REL 4171 Contemporary Christian Ethics 3 AS REL A survey of representative approaches to contemporary Christian ethics and their application to a number of ethical issues peculiar to personal and social life in contemporary society, with an emphasis on issues of race and gender and of violence and non-violence. Junior standing or CI. SMLE, 6AC, MW
REL 4215 Ancient Israel and the Development of the Hebrew Bible 3 AS REL An exploration of the formation and composition of the Hebrew Bible in light of the religious, social, political, and historical developments in antiquity. None 6AC, HP, AF, MW, LW, ALAMEA
REL 4216 Who Wrote the Bible (Genesis-Kings) 3 AS REL A critical examination of Genesis through 2 Kings. This course focuses on the history of the formation of the text and the development of the religious traditions represented therein. Special attention will be paid to Israelite Law, Covenant Theology, and the history of the religion(s) of the Children of Israel in their Ancient Near Eastern context. None 6AC, MW, LW
REL 4218 Women and the Bible 3 AS REL How the redactors of Genesis through 2 Kings viewed women; the role women played in the society of the time in which they are portrayed and in that of the redactors; and, an attempt to find the “women’s voices,” however muted, within the biblical text. None 6AC, HP, AF, LW, ALAMEA
RUS 3500 Russian Civilization 3 AS WLE A survey of the cultural history of Russia. None 6AC, MW
RUT 3110 Ninetheen Century Russian Literature in English 3 AS WLE Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature in English. Works by Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov. Junior standing 6AC, MW, LW
SCE 4310 Teaching Elementary School Science 3 ED EDE Techniques and materials for teaching science in the elementary school. Admission to College of Education and completion of General Distribution Requirements in the Natural Science area
SLS 1107 Foundations for University Success 1 AM SLS This lower-level course is designed to develop the skills required for success in university courses.  The competencies students will acquire include effective use of campus resources, community engagement, critical thinking, writing skills, and academic and career planning.  The course seeks to assist students toward self-actualization and integration into the life of the campus community.  None SMFS
SLS 2xxx Foundations of Professional Success 2 AM SLS This lower-level required course is designed to continue developing the skills required for success in university courses and the workplace. The competencies students will acquire include effective use of resources, gaining self-awareness, community engagement, critical thinking, writing skills, and academic and career planning. The course seeks to guide students toward self-discovery and enable the mapping of appropriate career and academic paths. PR: SLS 1107 SMFS
SLS 2401 Career Development Process 1-3 US DEA Students will study vocational choice theories and participate in career decision processes. Development of self-awareness and knowledge of career opportunities and requirements necessary for decision making. Available to lower level majors or non-majors. None
SMP 3012 Issues in Sport 3 ED EDP A study of organized sport as a pervasive part of contemporary society. By increasing understanding of some of the issues and controversies based on the structure of sport and society, individuals will be able to understand and improve sport experiences for themselves and others. None
SPA 3115 Introduction to Phonetics 3 AM CSD This course provides knowledge and development of skills in principles of phonetics and their application to normal and disordered speech, classification of speech sounds, and phonetic transcription utilizing international phonetic alphabet. None
SPA 4050 Introduction to the Clinical Process 3 AS Observation and participation in speech-language pathology and audiology services provided at USF-CSD clinical laboratory. Professional and ethical issues, oral and written communication skills are stressed through clinical and practical projects. PR: SPA 3004 and SPA 3310 SMCC
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 AS The nature and basic principles of human communication; emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills common to all forms of oral communication through a variety of experiences in public discourse. None SMSS, SS
SPN 1132 Introductory Spanish for High Beginners 3 AM The focus of SPN 1132 is the continued development of communicative abilities in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension of Spanish at the Novice-Mid+ level and an introduction to the cultural practices of the Spanish-speaking world. None
SOP 4004 Social Psychology 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations in the study of an individual’s behavior as it is affected by others. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better or CI.
SOP 4751 Psychology Applied to Law 3 AM PSY Course is designed to explore the application of psychological research and theory to the problems faced by the Legal System. Students will be given a broad overview of the relevant topics, problems, and methodologies in the field of Psychology and Law. PSY 3213
SOP 4777 Psych of Human Sexuality 3 AM PSY This course is designed to extend students’ understanding of psychology to the diverse nature and construct of human sexuality, sexual dysfunction, identity, and culture, focusing upon psychological factors. The course approaches this topic from a multidimensional perspective. PR: PSY 2012, PSY 3024, STA 2122 and a General Biology course
SOW 3101 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 BC SOK An integrating human behavior-social environment course emphasizing dynamics of behavior and environmental factors as they relate to social work practice with individuals, and families. majors only
SOW 3102 Human Behavior And The Social Environment II 3 BC SOK An integrating course emphasizing dynamics of behavior and environmental factors as they relate to social work practice with families, groups, organizations and communities. majors only
SOW 3203 Introduction to Social Work 3 BC SOK An introductory course tracing the development of social work as a profession including an examination of the knowledge, skill and attitudinal base of the profession and professional roles and functions. None
SOW 3210 The American Social Welfare System 3 BC SOK A general education introductory course which provides students with a framework for understanding the historical development of American social welfare, its value base, and its response to minorities, women, children, the elderly, and the disabled. None SS
SOW 3401 Research and Statistics For Social Work 3 BC SOK The purpose of this course is two-fold: to familiarize the student with research as it is practiced in the profession of Social Work; and to equip the student with those theoretical understandings necessary to be a critical consumer of social work research. PR: SOW 3101, SOW 4343, SOW 4522. Restricted to full Social Work majors, others by School permission
SOW 4341 Multi-Methods of Social Work Practice I: Micro-System Intervention 5 BC SOK First practice course emphasizing development of skills and interventive methods with individuals, families and small groups. Course includes both didactic and experiential learning components. PR: SOW 3101; SOW 4522. All prvisional major courses. Restricted to Social Work majors; others by School permission
SOW 4522 Multicultural America 3 BC SOK The course focuses on the students’ understanding of multicultural and intergenerational issues. All provisional major courses
SOW 4900 Directed Readings 1-9 BC SOK Content dependent upon student interest and ability. A contract will be jointly developed by student and instructor specifying nature of work to be completed. Completion of four social work courses including SOW 3401, upper level standing, and School permission
SOW 4930 Variable Topics in Social Work 1-3 BC SOK Variable title courses to expand on the four sequence areas in the Social Work core curriculum. Allows focus on areas relevant to student’s educational interest. Restricted to Social Work majors; others by School permission.
SPA 3004 Introduction to Language Development and Disorders 3 BC CSD This course introduces theoretical concepts and research findings concerning the normal developmental process of language learning as a basis for differentiating developmental delay or disorder of language. Junior standing
SPA 3011 Introduction to Speech Science 3 BC CSD Concentrated study of the acoustic, physiological and perceptual aspects of sound as related to normal and pathological speech communication. Introduction to instrumentation and measurement procedures. Junior standing; PR: SPA 3030, SPA 3112C.
SPA 3030 Introduction to Hearing Science 3 BC CSD Introduction to the field of hearing including: physics of sound, auditory anatomy and physiology, and psychophysics of hearing. Junior standing
SPA 3101 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism 3 BC CSD The neurological and anatomical basis of communication disorders. Comparisons of normal and pathological organic structures and their functional dynamics. Junior standing
SPA 3112C Applied Phonetics in Communication Disorders 3 BC CSD Introduction to phonetic analysis of normal and disordered speech, including extensive training in transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet. None
SPA 3310 Introduction to Disorders of Hearing 3 BC CSD The etiology, pathology, and management of disorders of the outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, retrocochlear, and central auditory systems. Junior standing; PR: SPA 3030
SPA 4050 Introduction to the Clinical Process 3 BC CSD Observation and participation in speech-language pathology and audiology services provided at USF-CSD clinical laboratory. Professional and ethical issues, oral and written communication skills are stressed through clinical and practical projects. PR: SPA 3004 and SPA 3310
SPA 4104 Neuroanatomy for Speech, Language and Hearing 3 BC CSD Students will learn neuroanatomical & neurophysiological principles, structures, and functions that subserve speech, hearing, language and cognition. A case-based approach will enable understanding of behavioral manifestations of neuropathologies. PR: SPA 3101 (highly recommended).
SPA 4250 Introduction to Speech Disorders 3 BC CSD This course will provide an overview of the mechanisms involved in speech production, and will review the nature and impact of speech sound disorders, fluency disorders, voice and resonance disorders, and organic speech disorders. PR: SPA 3101
SPA 4257 Adult Communication Disorders 3 BC CSD This course provides an overview of communication disorders seen in adult populations & prepares students for clinical encounters with this population. The disorders include those involving language, cognitive-communication, & speech & motor control. PR: SPA 4104; Junior standing
SPA 4321 Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation 3 BC CSD Assessment and management of individuals with hearing loss. Topics include: effects of hearing loss; assessment and intervention, including: a) amplification and cochlear impalnts; b) speechreading and auditory training; c) communication intervention. PR: SPA 3310 with a minimum grade of C-
SPA 4510 Intro. to Clinical Methods and Counseling in CSD 3 BC CSD This course introduces the student to fundamental skills and knowledge needed prior to beginning clinical work in speech-language pathology/audiology. Professional/ethical issues, principles of assessment/intervention,& interviewing skills are included. PR: SPA 3004, PR: SPA 3310
SPA 4906 Independent Study 1-10 BC CSD Indep. Study will allow UG students to work independently under the supervision of Faculty members in the pursuit of content gained independently. The course is repeatable for a total of 10 credits. Majors only. None
SPA 4930 Selected Topics 1-6 BC CSD Intensive study of topics in Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology, and/or Aural Rehabilitation conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. DPR
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 AS SPE The nature and basic principles of human communication; emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills common to all forms of oral communication through a variety of experiences in public discourse. None SMCO, SS
SPM 3012 Issues in Sport 3 EM EDJ A study of organized sport as a pervasive part of contempo- rary society. By increasing understanding of some of the issues and controversies based in the structures of sport and society, individuals will be able to improve sport experiences for themselves and others None
SPN 1120 Beginning Spanish I 4 AS WLE Development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Spanish. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish
SPN 1121 Beginning Spanish II 4 AS WLE Continued development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Spanish. PR: SPN 1120 or equivalent. Not open to native or near-native speakers of Spanish.
SPW 4900 Directed Study 1-3 AS WLE Departmental approval required.
SSE 4313 Teaching Elementary (K-6) Social Studies 3 ED EDE This course is designed to study techniques and strategies employed by K-6 social studies teachers that are effective in motivating elementary school aged youth to acquire the information, skills, and modes of reasoning unique to the social sciences. Admission to College of Education or CI.
SSE 4380 Global And Multicultural Perspectives in Education 3 ED EDW Examination of the major issues surrounding global and multicultural perspectives in education. Available to non-Education majors. PR: EDG 3604 and EDG 4620, or DPR MW
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics I 3 AS MTH Descriptive and Inferential Statistics; Principles of Probability Theory,
Discrete and Continuous Probability Distributions: Binomial Probability
Distribution, Poisson Probability Distribution, Uniform Probability
Distribution, Normal Dist and more
C (2.0) or better in High School Algebra or Elementary Algebra CPT score of 72 or better. SMMA, 6AM, QM, CAQR
STA 2122 Social Science Statistics 3 AS ISS Students are taught the fundamental vocabulary and symbols of statistics as well as commonly used statistical procedures in social sciences. Students conduct analyses, interpret results and make conclusions about research questions. None 6AM, QM
SYA 3110 Classical Theory 3 AS SOC The analysis of the philosophical foundations, central principles, and historical development of Sociological theory. Required for Sociology majors and minors. PR: SYG 2000 or CI.  6AC, LW
SYA 3300 Research Methods 3 AS SOC Introduction to the scientific method and its application to social science research. Research design, sampling techniques, and critical evaluation of social research. Required for Sociology majors. PR: STA 2122 or equivalent
SYA 4910 Individual Research 1-3 AS SOC Content depends on the interest of the student. A contract between the student and the sponsoring faculty member must be signed before class registration. Four courses in sociology, including SYA 3300, upper level standing, at least 3.0 overall GPA, or CI. DPR
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 AS SOC Selected specialized topics in Sociology. Topics such as AIDS in society, drugs in society, problems in education, sociology of childhood, public life, socio-biology. Content will vary by semester and by section. See class schedule for specific contents each semester. This course, in different content areas, may be repeated for credit. None
SYD 3700 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3 AS SOC This course introduces students to a sociological understanding of race and ethnic relations. Students will analyze sociological theories on race and stratification through readings, lectures, discussion, multimedia, and group research projects. None SS, HP
SYD 4410 Urban Sociology 3 AS SOC The social structure of the community in modern industrial societies. Analysis of community change. None
SYD 4800 Gender and Society 3 AS SOC Historical and current issues surrounding gender in America. Emphasis on exploring the causes, meaning, and consequences of gender differences, interpersonal relationships, and institutional participation. None
SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 AS SOC This course introduces undergraduate students to the discipline of sociology. During the semester, we will analyze sociological theories, core concepts, and issues through readings, lectures, discussions, films, and hands-on research assignments. None SMSS, SS
SYG 3235 Latina Lives 3 AS SOC An exploration of the experiences of Latinas in the U.S.by examining the sociological themes of migration, work, family, oppression, activism, identity construction, spirituality, and sexuality through short stories, poetry, and scholarly research. PR: SYG 2000 or SYG 2010 6AC, AF, LW ALAMEA
SYP 3060 Sociology of Sexualities 3 AS SOC Explores the interactions, among and between people, and people and institutions that form the boundaries through which sexualities are understood in the United States. Addresses interactions with and within medical and religious institutions, racial/ethnic cultures, families and popular culture. None
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 AS SOC An exploration of the complexity of the causes and consequences of physical and emotional violence among family members. Topics include the meanings and behaviors of violence, the process of help-seeking, and social interventions for offenders and victims. Open to nonmajors. None
TAX 4001 Concepts of Federal Income Taxation 3 BU ACC Major concepts used in taxation of income by federal government including enactment of tax laws, basic tax research, preparation of basic tax returns and exploration of tax policy issues. PR: ACG 3103 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
TAX 5015 Federal Taxation of Business Entities 3 BU ACC Tax issues encountered by small businesses. Includes tax planning, capital formation and preservation, tax compliance and tax alternatives. PR: TAX 4001 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
THE 2xxx Theater and Culture 3 TAR This course explores the contributions of theatre practitioners and audiences to the performance experience, aspects of theater making and an overview of theater history. None SMHU
THE 4180 Theatre Origins 3 TA TAR An analysis of the development of theatre out of myth, ritual, and liturgy. Emphasis placed on what attempts to understand the resulting phenomena (e.g. Aristotle’s Poetics) can teach us about the nature of our art. Either THE 4180 or THE 4562 is required of all theatre majors. PR: THE 3110 or THE 3111 and one of the following: THE 4320, THE 4330, THE 4360, THE 4401, THE 4435, THE 4442, THE 4480. Open to senior non-majors with CI. 6AC, MW, LW
TSL 4240 Applied Linguistics in Teaching Diverse Students 3 EM EDX Instructional applications of teachers’ knowledge about language (phonology, morphology, syntax,
pragmatics, discourse) and language acquisition in linguistically diverse classrooms.
None
TSL 4xxx (4344) Foundations of Teaching ESOL in Mainstream Classes 3 EM EDX Candidates apply knowledge of theories, policies, and methods of ESOL teaching to content area
instruction in English immersion programs. Candidates complete 15 hours of field experience tutoring English learners.
CP: TSL 4240; TSL 4240 can be taken as a pre-requisite or co-requisite
TSL 5085 ESOL I – Theory and Practice of Teaching English Language Learners 3 ED EDX This course is for undergraduate degree holding, preprofessional (preservice) teachers to learn about appropriate instruction, assessment and learning opportunities for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students in the content areas. None
TSL 5086 ESOL II-Secondary Language & Literacy Acquisition in Children & Adolescents 3 ED EDX This course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of instructional delivery which caters for the linguistic and literacy needs of minority / heritage communities. PR: TSL 5085
TSL 5242 ESOL III-Language Principles, Acquisition & Assessment for English Language Learners 3 ED EDX This course provides an overview of the components of language, linking them to methods and techniques of providing comprehensible instruction to LEP students. PR: TSL 5086
URP 4052 Urban and Regional Planning 3 AS GPY The geographic foundations of the modern city, metropolitan development, and the trend toward megalopolis. Examined are the political problems of conflicting jurisdictions at the local, county, state, national, and international levels. PR: GEO 2400, GEO 3602
WST 3015 Introduction to Women’s Studies 3 AS WST This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of Women’s Studies through a critical examination of the way gender, race, class and sexuality are socially constructed and demonstrates how activism is inherent in Women’s Studies discourse. None SS AF ALAMEA
WST 3210 European Feminist History: Pre-18th Century 3 AS WST Survey of European feminist history prior to the 18th century (focusing primarily on Western Europe). Examines women’s lives, roles, ideas, as well as origins of Western attitudes toward relation of power to gender, race and class. No prerequisites. None 6AC HP
WST 3311 Issues in Feminism 3 AS WST Survey of major issues relevant to the female experience: marriage and the family, sexuality, work, creativity. PR: WST 3015 SS
WST 3324 Women, Environment and Gender 3 AS WST Investigation of intersection of women’s studies, gender and environment with focus on women’s health. Exploration of hypothesis formulation and testing, current issues. PR: BSC 1005 or BSC 2010, any Introductory science course from biology, chemistry, physics, public health or WST4320 MW
WST 3412 Women in the Developing World 3 AS WST Survey of status of women in Asia, Africa, Latin and Caribbean America, compared to that in USA, Canada, West Europe, Marxist-Leninist countries. (May also be taken for credit in Government and International Affairs.) None
WST 4262 Literature by Women of Color in the Diaspora 3 AS WST An introduction to contemporary women writers of color in the U.S.: Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Chicanas/U.S. Latinas. Readings will include literature and contextual articles on historical and cultural issues. Will not be counted toward the English major 6AC LW
WST 4410 Postcolonial Women Writers 3 AS WST Introduces the literature of women from various Anglophone countries in Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia; some U.S. writers will be included to represent a third world diasporic consciousness. Will not be counted toward the English major
WST 4910 Directed Research 1-3 AS WST To provide advanced students with interdisciplinary research experience in areas of specific interest. Registration requires written contract signed by student and instructor of choice
WST 4930 Selected Topics 1-3 AS WST Study in special areas such as Women and Work, Reproductive Law, Women and Health. None
ZOO 2303 Vertebrate Zoology 3 AS BIN The origin, diversity, and adaptations of the vertebrates. Phylogenetic systematics (cladistics) will be used as the basis for determining evolutionary relationships of organisms. Monophyletic groupings provide a framework for examining behavior, physiology, and ecology in an explicit evolutionary context. Vertebrates common to Florida and the southeastern United States will be emphasized. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
ZOO 4454 Fish Biology 3 AS BIN Covers the systematics, anatomy, physiology, reproductive biology, behavior and ecology of fish. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, and (ZOO 3713C or PCB 3712 or BSC 2093C or ZOO 2303)
ZOO 4513 Animal Behavior 3 AS BIN An introduction to comparative animal behavior, with analysis of types of animal behavior, their function and evolutionary origin. Lecture only. PR: (PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063) and CHM 2210 and (MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023); CP: CHM 2211
ZOO 4694 Developmental Biology 3 AS BCM This course will use a problem solving approach to provide fundamental knowledge of scientific concepts and principles involved in the mechanisms underlying patterns of embryonic development for majors/nonmajors. PR: PCB 3023, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L CHM 2045, and CHM 2046
ZOO 4753C Human Histology and Molecular Pathology of Disease 4 AS BCM The study of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying various disease states of the human body present in the context of traditional pathology. PR: PCB 3023, PCB 3063, CHM 2210 and MAC 1105 or higher level MAC or STA 2023; CP: CHM 2211

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